-556

I’m David Fullerton, Stack Overflow’s CTO, responsible for the product, engineering, and community teams.

I joined Stack Overflow in 2010 because I believed in the vision and mission of Stack Overflow. I wanted to be a part of building a community where programmers come together to help one another learn and share their knowledge with one another. I loved how the site was run in the open, in collaboration with its community, and moderated by members of the community.

I’m here nearly a decade later because I believe we can continue to build this community together and make it an even more welcoming and inclusive place than it is today.

In the last few weeks, we made a series of mistakes, both in our actions and in the ways that we communicated those actions. In doing so, we hurt people who believe in that mission and who want to help us make the community welcoming and open to all. While Sara and others were on the front lines of that, I was personally involved at each step along the way and ultimately responsible, and I’m deeply sorry for the hurt that we’ve caused.

First of all, we hurt members of our LGBTQ+ community when they felt they couldn’t participate authentically and we didn’t respond quickly or strongly enough in supporting them. Worse, through our handling of this situation, we made them a target for harassment as people debated their right to express themselves and be addressed according to how they identify.

I am responsible for that, and I am deeply sorry. We absolutely support the LGBTQ+ community, and we’re committed to making our community a place that is open and welcoming to everyone. We’re working on an update to our Code of Conduct which we’re sharing with moderators for feedback tomorrow and the rest of the community later this week. We’ll also work on making more resources and materials available to our moderators to help them support members of the community as we all learn together how to be more welcoming and inclusive.

Second, we hurt a longstanding member of the community and an important volunteer moderator. She deserved the benefit of a private, comprehensive process. In the absence of a clear process for handling this kind of situation, we should have taken inspiration from our existing Moderator Action Review Process. We made a decision to act quickly, which I personally approved, but in doing so skipped several critical parts of the process. In acting quickly, we also acted at a time which coincided with a Jewish holiday which she and many other members of our community observe, and we should have taken that more into account in the process.

I’m responsible for that, and I’m sorry. We’ll be reaching out to her directly to apologize for the lack of process, privacy, and to discuss next steps. We’ll keep those discussions completely private unless we both agree to share any of it with the community.

We’ll be sharing with our moderators this week our proposed processes for handling situations like this in the future. This includes a process for handling moderator removals, and a process for reinstating moderators who wish to be reinstated.

Third, we hurt the moderators and members of our communities. Community moderation is the backbone of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange, and our moderators are a vital part of us creating a more welcoming and inclusive place. We need to be working with our moderators and community, rather than working against them, in order to create the kind of community where everyone feels welcome and able to share their knowledge.

I’m responsible for that as well, and I’m sorry for the hurt that we’ve caused. Going forward, we will be working with the community to overhaul how we gather input and feedback from our moderators and members of the community to make sure that your voices are heard and involved in the process, not just informed after decisions have been made.

Finally, I want to apologize again for all of the pain we have caused. I am more committed than ever to creating a welcoming and inclusive community across Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange, and the mistakes we made over the past few weeks made that worse, not better. I know we have lost the trust of many of you, and that trust must be re-earned over time by more than just words. That starts this week with some of the concrete steps we are taking with the moderator removal process and the Code of Conduct changes, but the hard work will continue for years. Those first steps are:

  • On Monday, October 7, we’ll be sharing a second draft of an update to our Code of Conduct with all moderators for feedback
  • On Thursday, October 10, the update to the Code of Conduct will be announced publicly
  • By Friday, October 11, we’ll share the processes for moderator removal and reinstatement with moderators for their feedback

Looking forward, Stack Overflow is just beginning this new stage in its growth as a company. One of our top priorities across the entire team is to continue to make the community more inclusive and welcoming. We recognize that the community is the heartbeat of Stack Overflow, and we deeply appreciate all that you do. We know that our moderators care deeply about the future of our community, and we’re committed to involving you more as we evolve. We have an incredible opportunity to impact the world, and we hope that you will continue to join us on that mission.

Thank you for listening, and thank you for your patience with us as we continue to work our way through this.

This post was written with the input and support of Sara Chipps, Tim Post, and the community management team.


Email was sent to Monica on October 8.

  • 129
    What happened to all the comments? – Bart Silverstrim Oct 22 '19 at 19:57
  • 242
    @BartSilverstrim Openness happened. – Sébastien Renauld Oct 22 '19 at 20:46
  • 258
    @SébastienRenauld Openness, sure, but don't forget inclusivity. It makes people feel included when their comments are deleted. – Fabio says Reinstate Monica Oct 22 '19 at 23:15
  • 8
    Technically, talking about the gradual but steady descent of the question score might have been off-topic. It might have been unique in that it first reached several hundred positive before diving under zero. – Gloweye Oct 23 '19 at 8:16
  • 69
    @DavidFullerton did you delete the 115 comments that were here before? Can you comment on why? – logos_164 Oct 23 '19 at 21:09
  • 115
    @DavidFullerton: How many downvotes would it take before a message gets through to you guys? Do you have a number in your mind personally? Is it smaller than infinity? – user541686 Oct 23 '19 at 23:43
  • 28
    @Mehrdad You can delete posts and comments and the downvotes never happened! It's great! – Sébastien Renauld Oct 24 '19 at 9:24
  • 18
    Man, this is going to end up more negative than it ever was positive. – Jo King Oct 25 '19 at 3:54
  • 11
    Those ones who thank this post immediately after it's asked, what do you think now ? It's really ironic ! – Eric Wang Oct 25 '19 at 5:34
  • 33
    is it time to slowly transition to a new platform? let's not forget that SE does not exist without "us", right? hell, they are not even get paid! – Eugene Oct 26 '19 at 4:08
  • 66
    @DavidFullerton: I use the Internet since 1996 and I've seen many preposterously unjust actions and many preposterously hypocrite "apologies", but this one and Sara Chipp's one are undoubtedly in the Top5. But since I can't help being polite even to people who may or may not deserve it, I'll use the "please" word in << Please, retract this - and reinstate Monica ASAP >> – Teem Porary Oct 26 '19 at 18:11
  • 91
    Notice how this post is now at -134 despite originally having positives in the hundreds. There is a reason for that. You have to actually followup your talk with actions (or, at the very least, more talk). Hopefully it's evident by now that we aren't playing along with this game any longer. Too bad: I was one of those whose now-deleted comments were positive and optimistic and thankful. Way to totally ruin a brief moment of goodwill between us all. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 28 '19 at 13:00
  • 32
    @Shadow If you think that SE has only offended one person and/or only made one mistake, you have not been paying attention! – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 28 '19 at 13:13
  • 34
    Your words still mean nothing, even if you delete mine. Reinstate Monica. – user303172 Oct 29 '19 at 22:02
  • 19
    David has now lost more reputation from this apology than he has gained, which is surely a metaphor for SO during this fiasco with the CoC changes – Jo King Nov 4 '19 at 0:41

72 Answers 72

1 2
3
14

Thank you for for your apology! It is much appreciated.

For me, the most important part is:

I am more committed than ever to creating a welcoming and inclusive community across Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange, and the mistakes we made over the past few weeks made that worse, not better. I know we have lost the trust of many of you, and that trust must be re-earned over time by more than just words. by David Fullerton, emphasis mine

I want to say Let's forget it, but currently I can't. But with the above statement it seems I can in future.

I say this, because in the past you often said sorry, promised improvements, but forgot it a few month later. Just make sure you remember this statement in a year. And ten.

Thanks again.

| improve this answer | |
14

Ok. Thanks for the apology. I'm not too sentimental like that, so I wasn't seeking it in the first place. All I really wanted from SE was a clear explanation with examples why you fired Monica. In this post, you say you'll only do that if you both agree? That's not reasonable. The only circumstance where keeping that information private would be if Monica admits fault and concedes her removal was just. Monica is equivalent to a public figure on SE. We deserve answers.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Think you misread: "unless both agree" only refers to future actions? / Moreover: Firing was 'shipping' a mod-removal. Violating the existing processes and expectations, and now admitted as 'mistakes'. Fine. In a working version-control system, one rolls back (posts on SE have that very feature). As firing was a fruit of the forbidden tree: why not reinstate M 'immediately?' That's what I wonder about. I only see that SE sees that as waste of time, as they still want "to stand by that decision"? – LаngLаngС Oct 7 '19 at 6:55
  • @LаngLаngС Why not immediately? Because they apparently did already consider firing her, now they agree to review that decision. That puts Monica somewhere in the process. More thoughts on this. – user212646 Oct 7 '19 at 7:00
  • @fredsbend: But they considered firing her on what is apparently false cause. And got outed about it. And still double down on the termination. – einpoklum Oct 7 '19 at 21:06
  • 2
    @fredsbend: Would appreciate your thoughts on my own reply. – einpoklum Oct 7 '19 at 22:13
14

Your post is like a breath of fresh air compared to what I've recently seen posted by the company here. As many others have already stated, thank you. Among the other answers, there are many questions, comments & suggestions expressed about various aspects stated in, or omitted from, your post, but I will mainly discuss the timing you provided of the CoC related changes, i.e.,

  • On Monday, October 7, we’ll be sharing a second draft of an update to our Code of Conduct with all moderators for feedback
  • On Thursday, October 10, the update to the Code of Conduct will be announced publicly
  • By Friday, October 11, we’ll share the processes for moderator removal and reinstatement with moderators for their feedback

As a non-moderator myself, who has been a member for just under a year, and who has only now mostly during the past week or so tried to catch up with what has been going on here & in the past, I don't know how realistic those timelines are. Nonetheless, I don't believe there's any hard & fast deadlines to complete any step in the process, so I suggest it's better to do it right rather than on time. If you find any step is taking more time than you expected, please adjust the schedule accordingly and let us know. As long as the process doesn't drag out for too long a time & you don't provide too many updates that don't pan out, I at least, and I trust most of the community, would appreciate the updates and the extra care to try to make good decisions.

Also, your words are a great start, and I hope they're also backed up with appropriate actions. If so, it'll help start building back trust from the community with the company. Also, I hope the company has begun to make a significant change in how they will deal with us, so there will in the future be increased communication and more transparency from the company, listening to & taking into account our feedback, and making appropriate adjustments as required, similar to what is requested in A general call for increased transparency from Stack Exchange, Incꓸ.

I sincerely believe that by working together, we can continue to make the SE sites places where members will generally always feel welcome, be happy to participate and feel they are part of a community they want be involved with; the general public can continue to ask and/or find excellent questions and answers to solve their needs; and the company will prosper, both financially as well as with the good will from the members and the general public.

| improve this answer | |
14

This is a peculiar flavored mashup of sidestepping, backpedaling and extenuation.

Like seeing someone take a chug of a beer they find after a party, and it's full of butts.

Think, do, own it. When you get the order wrong it doesn't work.

Consider the impact of your actions and how they affect everyone. You can't fix some things by doing one thing or another; that applies before, during and after.

It is sometimes amazing what can be learned from another, and sometimes amazing what one forgets about their own.

Source: "Learning Curves | Recognizing a Race-Friendly Dyno Graph":

"Getting In Shape
A good percentage of the very-best engineers, racecar builders and engine tuners understand and use dyno graphs as outlined to improve a vehicle’s performance. However, there are a select few racecar and engine tuners that focus on the shape of the dyno curve to optimize controllability, traction and suspension stability. Why should this be important to you? When you shift gears and it upsets tire grip, you get passed—if you are lucky. If unluckly, the loss of traction can result in a crash. Likewise, when you feed in throttle to launch your drag car or attempt to accelerate off a corner only to spin the tires, the finish line just got a lot closer, for the competition that just passed you. As the sample dyno charts will demonstrate, the shape and length of the power curve beyond peak horsepower plays a significant roll.".

Source: "Racing Line":

"Introduction

The racing line line depends on the following factors: braking point, turn in point, apex, and the position and direction of the next corner.

It is important to remember that there is rarely a perfect line through any corner for all circumstances. It depends on the characteristics of your car, your cornering strategy and the conditions. If you’re racing, you may also have to react to the position of other cars on the track. You should experiment with different lines and learn from instructors and the people who know the track best.".

See how similar information and situations read differently. It's not just applying what you know but knowing how it is applied and what the result will be.

If you can't apply what you already know to various situations successfully then you either need to learn to do that, learn more, or learn to leave things alone.

| improve this answer | |
13
  • On Monday, October 7, we’ll be sharing a second draft of an update to our Code of Conduct with all moderators for feedback
  • On Thursday, October 10, the update to the Code of Conduct will be announced publicly
  • By Friday, October 11, we’ll share the processes for moderator removal and reinstatement with moderators for their feedback

This seems like a poorly chosen order - the code of conduct should be reviewed by the moderators (including reinstated ones) before being enacted. How can that happen if the reinstatement is last?

| improve this answer | |
  • The COC changes triggered off all of it. And honestly, looking at all this drama, I think the mods need some time to decompress. I know I do – Journeyman Geek Oct 7 '19 at 4:12
  • 8
    Actually, I think this is the proper order, allowing mods to see the new CoC before having to decide whether to seek reinstatement. – Jeffrey Bosboom Oct 7 '19 at 6:45
  • @fredsbend Actually, an elected (as opposed to appointed, which happens on beta sites) moderator who has stepped down in good standing can request to have their moderator position reinstated. To allow that has been the policy of SE for a very long time. Moderators step down from time to time for a variety of reasons, far from all of them in protest of any action taken by SE. Stepping down is not a rage-quit. Also, nothing prevents a moderator who stepped down in good standing from a position as appointed on a beta site from running in a moderator election on that same site at a later time. – a CVn Oct 7 '19 at 11:33
  • 11
    My issue is not with the order but the duration. There's no way that SO.Inc can incorporate feedback over a 3-4 day period. – Draco18s no longer trusts SE Oct 7 '19 at 14:41
  • Who said they're reinstating anyone? – einpoklum Oct 7 '19 at 20:58
  • I guess I assumed they would be reinstating moderators that were removed or that left voluntarily based on the fact that they are planning an official reinstatement process. – Charlie Oct 8 '19 at 0:02
  • @JeffreyBosboom Non-reinstated ex-mods likely won't be able to see the new CoC revision to inform that decision. There's no sign yet of reinstatements coming. Also, it's unlikely that they are actually looking for any disagreement feedback or questions, because you can see what they did to Monica for asking questions, and they are mostly standing by that so far. – WBT Oct 8 '19 at 22:04
13

It seems to me that you brought this whole thing on yourselves.

This is a technical Q&A site, whose bread and butter is highly technical questions ranging from C-language rounding to server-farm emergency backup generators. Gender issues are highly unlikely to arise.

Frankly, this site is positioned to unite everyone who does tech.

So why is SE, as a company, publicly making a spectacle of themselves on gender identity issues?

I've noticed SE has a very small minority of stacks of a very different nature - Interpersonal Skills, Parenting, and a few religious stacks. These are the sites where gender issues come up, and I'm particularly looking at Interpersonal Skills stack, because that seems to be a lightning rod for all sorts of things. Take the Twitter debacle earlier, which was fundamentally about SE's core/base customers considering the content to be out-of-place on this platform.

The sway is mystifying: these sites (and their advocates) seem to be the "600 pound gorilla" of SE -- the company reacts emotionally, even irrationally, to anything that would threaten the status-quo of these particular stacks. It's almost as if an owner said "these sites must succeed at the expense of all else; I'll stake my company on it".

Coz that seems to be happening.

For SE to dig in their heels and say "We want to die on this hill", doesn't make much sense.

How about instead of dividing the community over stacks that aren't even a good fit for the platform... divide the platform! Divest the troublesome stacks. Spin them off to someone who actually wants to be in the social Q&A business, which is a very different business than the technical Q&A business. That would basically make gender issues irrelevant at Stack Exchange.

I'm not saying StackExchange shouldn't care about gender issues, but maybe employees and investors who care about that should do their politicking at a personal level instead of embroiling the company.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Funny thing is these sites handle it gracefully. A lot of this is an attempt to get greater inclusiveness on SO. The twitter debacle itself was due to someone on SO taking offence to a HNQ. On the other hand, divesting the smaller sites might be something some people want - simply cause they can't see past SO. – Journeyman Geek Nov 1 '19 at 22:40
  • Unfortunately it seems that SE have appointed one or two zealots to key positions over the past year or two, and now they're either not being reigned in, or the whole company is drinking the same kool aid. – Doctor Jones Nov 4 '19 at 9:07
  • 2
    This is a technical Q&A site, whose bread and butter is highly technical questions ranging from C-language rounding to server-farm emergency backup generators. No, that is wrong. You can say that most of the trafic is generated by the "technical" sites, but there are also of other sites where gender issues might be a problem. So the main problem here is, that SE Inc. didn't communicate that well, they never told us that these problems arose not from SO, SF, SU, AskU... but from other sites (I don't care which!). To sum it up: The communication of SE Inc is still severely broken! – Ocaso Protal Nov 5 '19 at 7:53
12

Every time I look at you I don't understand

Why you let the things you did get so out of hand.

You'd have managed better if you'd had it planned.

Why'd you choose [a delay in] time [with] such a [bad hand]?

– Andrew Lloyd Webber, Tim Rice, Jesus Christ Superstar (1970)

| improve this answer | |
11

This response is long-awaited... But it feels heartfelt and meaningful.

As just another Stack Exchange community member: Thank you.

I'm certain I speak for many members when I say that I'm satisfied knowing that this event is being taken seriously, and my faith in Stack Exchange is starting to become restored.

In the future... I hope that it doesn't take this long to address an uproar of this magnitude. However, I think we should focus on forward movement with regards to the past.

I still hope SE becomes more transparent, but that's a conversation for a different location, and a different time.

By Friday, October 11, we’ll share the processes for moderator removal and reinstatement with moderators for their feedback

Is there going to be any specific focus on the most recent moderator walkouts? Will those moderators be contacted privately to discuss possible reinstatement, assuming they're interested? If so, can you elaborate?

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    "Will those moderators be contacted privately to discuss possible reinstatement, assuming they're interested? If so, can you elaborate?" - This is just speculation on my part, but assuming SE handles it like they handled the situation on the Workplace, it'll likely be up to the mods to request reinstatement, but SE will probably reinstate them if they do request it. – V2Blast Oct 6 '19 at 22:00
  • 2
    Would you mind bolding the whole last paragraph, please? – aparente001 Oct 7 '19 at 3:59
  • 1
    @aparente001 Good idea. Edited that. – Spevacus Oct 7 '19 at 12:03
  • 3
    You've been misled. It might feel nice, but it's mostly a nothing-burger. Specifically - there is no reinstatement. – einpoklum Oct 7 '19 at 21:02
  • @einpoklum that's not true, moderators who did ask to be reinstated have been, the door is open. – Tensibai Oct 8 '19 at 22:28
  • 1
    @Tensibai: That's not what I meant. I was talking about a reinstatement through a nullification of the invalid dismissal - not a "kiss the ring" reinstatement upon penitent request. – einpoklum Oct 8 '19 at 22:41
  • @einpoklum I've no will to be reinstated. So that's doesn't sound a good idea from my point of view. – Tensibai Oct 8 '19 at 22:55
  • 1
    @Tensibai: Fair enough, but Monica Cellio is who we're talking about here. – einpoklum Oct 8 '19 at 23:02
  • @einpoklum your comment doesn't sound talking about Monica specifically, specially not when the answer talk about the moderators who walked away. I can understand you think your answer address this, but it does not imho – Tensibai Oct 8 '19 at 23:17
  • you have drunk the kool-aid ... – user148287 Oct 11 '19 at 15:59
11

I am pleased to see this message from the CTO of Stack Overflow; it goes a long way toward correcting things. However, while what has been done so far is necessary, it is not sufficient.

It is critical to realize that certain important decisions should not be rushed, even if one has good intentions. I have to second what others have said that the moderators should have more time to review and respond to the new CoC before it is published. Another week would not be an excessive amount of time and would far better provide adequate time to respond and for any needed changes to be made before the new CoC is made public.

After publicly naming Monica as having been fired they need to publicly post a retraction and apology.

There have been several other issues, besides Monica's firing, that have upset the community, and rightly so. These other issues also need to be addressed.

Although Stack Overflow has made some reassuring statements, which certainly are good steps toward correcting their errors, we will have to see what they actually do over the coming weeks. It is their actions, not just words, that will show their true intentions.

EDIT: I tend to be optimistic and willing to give people the benefit of the doubt. So when the CTO of Stack Overflow posted a better sounding apology with a promise of improvements to come I was hopeful and willing to wait and see what happened. It has been a month with no really substantial improvements in the numerous issues affecting these sites: Firing mods and forced relicensing: is Stack Exchange still interested in cooperating with the community? Therefore I must add my voice to others expressing their dissatisfaction with Stack Exchange. As shown in the link above there are a number of issues; there seems to be little that the average user can do, but this link has ideas on what can be done to help address one issue: How can we help Monica Cellio?

| improve this answer | |
8

On Monday, October 7, we’ll be sharing a second draft of an update to our Code of Conduct with all moderators for feedback

On Thursday, October 10, the update to the Code of Conduct will be announced publicly

This is great, really. Coming from one of the Moderator's who resigned, and then changed his mind and came back -- before this was issued BTW. I do believe this should go a long was to prevent future events like this.

I’m responsible for that, and I’m sorry. We’ll be reaching out to her directly to apologize for the lack of process, privacy, and to discuss next steps. We’ll keep those discussions completely private unless we both agree to share any of it with the community.

This is as much as you could ask for at the moment, and took a ton of courage to post. Admitting, apologizing, owning, and attempting to rectify. This make me very hopeful that our big community will survive and thrive.

I do believe there is a road back for Monica as I still believe her heart is always in the right place, and I hope that path back is acceptable to all involved.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I may not fully agree with you (the jury will be out for a while yet on any attempts to rectify), but this post lives up to the moniker it is posted under! – Caleb Oct 7 '19 at 12:21
  • 2
    @Caleb I don't know for sure, but I feel as though SE will try to smooth this over with Monica. She used her real name here and her reputation suffered a hit when this all went down. – Neo Oct 7 '19 at 12:46
  • 11
    "This is as much as you could ask for at the moment, and took a ton of courage to post." I can't agree with that. They even went as far to have an SE employee speak to a media outlet to name and shame Monica ("Cellio (she/her) would not use stated pronouns, which violates our current CoC."). This is at best hinted at ("privacy"). The accusation was made public, the apology (once they actually reach out to Monica) will be private ("unless we both agree to share any of it"). It's a step forward, but only a small one. – Anne Daunted GoFundMonica Oct 7 '19 at 20:45
  • 7
    How is this "great"? It's the same thing they were going to do before this apology post. It's we're sorry, but nothing changes kind of a thing. – einpoklum Oct 7 '19 at 21:08
  • 1
    @AnneDaunted based on my past experience this is a great step forward. With a C level responding to this, I hold out hope for a resolution. – Neo Oct 7 '19 at 22:53
  • @einpoklum Time will tell. – Neo Oct 7 '19 at 22:53
  • 2
    It's been a week since we last heard anything official from SE. I think time told. I guess they're waiting it out till people accept that the old SE is dead, long live the new SE, and the ones who can't get cozy with the new one leave. – Pascal says Talk to Monica Oct 14 '19 at 18:05
4

Hey David and Stack Overflow,

This is a good step and thank you for this. It is great to see you acknowledge where you went wrong and what process you're going to work on to fix this.

One thing I've been trying to mention in posts but haven't seen addressed is getting proper training for your volunteer moderators.

There are courses in non-violent communication, conflict management and other areas of moderation you can pay for.

I think you are being unkind towards yourselves when you don't train moderators at all and then expect them to endure the empathy fatigue community moderation involves while behaving in a welcoming empathic way.

I think you can benefit from actually investing in moderators and community members. Issues like dealing with people from different cultures are not something people are born with.

| improve this answer | |
  • 23
    Which side of this was looking for a way to co-exist in spite of disagreement in the first place? Which side kept actively reaching out for a resolution after it went sideways? I don't doubt training is something volunteer moderators could benefit from, but this is suggesting a solution to the wrong problem. – Caleb Oct 7 '19 at 8:57
  • 1
    @Caleb both sides were reaching out for resolution after it went sideways and both sides could benefit from better communication and conflict resolution tools. Both sides were side of the conflict and both could benefit from said training. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Oct 7 '19 at 9:01
  • 17
    We must have very different versions of what qualifies as "reaching out". Even the still active moderators have been protesting in droves for weeks now over the lack of reaching out or any serious engagement of the issues from SE's side. – Caleb Oct 7 '19 at 9:31
  • 9
    In this particular matter, IMHO, it seems like SE staff should get those trainings you mentioned. I feel from this answer it somehow illustrates that moderator(s) are the guilty party in this occasion. – Vishwa Oct 7 '19 at 10:34
  • 2
    @Vishwa to be clear, I do not believe that moderators are the "guilty" party in this occasion. I believe that Stack Overflow needs to invest a lot more into their moderators and how seriously they take the content quality and inclusiveness on this network. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Oct 7 '19 at 11:40
  • 2
    The bigger elephant in the room is yet SE being very lax on drive-by-users creation to inflate user numbers. This is being clearly abused by droves of people who do not agree and do not want to follow SE rules and policies, who do not need to be nice to moderators or longtime users, who just want a quick fix and do not want and need to invest on quality content. And that is undermining things much more than dealing with "different cultures". IMO, that ought to be dealt much sooner than "proper training". While that is not dealt with, I would not want to be on any moderator' s shoes. – Rui F Ribeiro Oct 7 '19 at 17:15
  • 5
    Where is the actual "good step"? It doesn't look like they're planning to do something concretely different than before. – einpoklum Oct 7 '19 at 20:59
  • 4
    @BenjaminGruenbaum if that's what you mean, you should say it clearly I think. you said One thing I've been trying to mention in posts but haven't seen addressed is getting proper training for your volunteer moderators.. Matter at hand occurs basically because the SE staff has no such training, discipline nor integrity. (not all). I agree that SE needs to invest more in not only moderators but all contributors alike. – Vishwa Oct 8 '19 at 4:37
3

"make it an even more welcoming and inclusive place"

Unless you are CIS Gendered, Heteronomative and Socially and Politically Conservative. Then, you can go pound sand.

(Or find an alternative that is welcoming and inclusive to those people groups.)

I understand the need to find some middle ground, but the ground chosen by SE is so far to the LGBTQ+ side that Monica was basically removed for a thought crime and the rest of us better get in line RIGHT NOW!

| improve this answer | |
1 2
3

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .