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https://stackoverflow.com/site-analytics

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https://stackoverflow.com/tools

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  • 6
    A period is supposed to go inside the quotation marks when completing a sentence. Why would we intentionally make it incorrect? If it's bothersome for some reason, the sentence should be rewritten to some other form, such as "The page you're trying to visit requires the 'access to site analytics' privilege."
    – animuson StaffMod
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:06
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    @animuson only in US English. In British English and, for example, in Russian dots and comas should be outside the quotes. Oct 25 '19 at 17:08
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    Yes, and all of our text follows US English. So it would not make sense to do that.
    – animuson StaffMod
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:10
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    @animuson at least, please, make it's possible to localize it on international sites. Oct 25 '19 at 17:11
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    Seems bizarre that it would be correct in US English. Same way you wouldn't put punctuation belonging to the main sentence within parentheses that are part of that sentence, unless of course that's also how it's done in the US.
    – 404
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:11
  • @Suvitruf I'm pretty sure the text is already localizable. On RuSO, the period is inside the quotes, but I'm pretty sure SE uses community translations. Oct 25 '19 at 17:12
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    @TheWanderer the text access to site analytics is translated. But the quotes and dot are hardcoded. So we don't have ability to fix it. Oct 25 '19 at 17:13
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    @Suvitruf It sounds like you should rewrite this question to be a localization request instead of proper placement of periods.
    – animuson StaffMod
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:16
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    @animuson if I do so, the answer by terdon would be irrelevant. So, I will accept his answer and will create a new question specifically about ruSO. Oct 25 '19 at 17:17
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    @animuson I think the easiest way to fix the localization issue linked in the above comment would be to make the period outside the quotation mark. While having it outside isn't the preferred way in American English, it's not wrong to have it that way. Also, as far as I'm aware, having it inside is also incorrect for the three other languages Stack Overflow is localized to. Putting it outside will fix it for all four localized languages, as well as be still correct for American English. Jul 19 '20 at 21:21
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In English, there are two schools of thought on this. The convention in the US is to have the punctuation be inside the quotes:

Alex said "Yes I will come."

or

"I will go," she said.

The British tend to move it outside the quotes, and also use single instead of double:

Alex said 'Yes, I will come'.

or

'I will go', she said.

Both are widely used and neither is more correct than the other. However, since SE is a US-based company, it seems reasonable that they'd follow US conventions.


The following is from this site, emphasis mine:

The above examples also show that the American style places commas and periods inside the quotation marks, even if they are not in the original material. British style (more sensibly) places unquoted periods and commas outside the quotation marks. For all other punctuation, the British and American styles are in agreement: unless the punctuation is part of the quoted material, it goes outside the quotation marks.

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  • Also, we have localized sites. In Russian dots and comas should be always outside the quotes. Oct 25 '19 at 17:09
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    @Suvitruf if the page is in Russian, then yes, absolutely. It should follow the conventions of the language it is written in. But since you showed us a page in English, it should follow the English conventions.
    – terdon
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:11
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    American English is definitely weird. Oct 25 '19 at 17:11
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    But is it a quote in this context? Maybe the name of the privilege should be italicized and we can avoid the entire argument.
    – ColleenV
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:11
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    I've been doing it wrong this whole time...
    – user245382
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:11
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    @ColleenV as far as I know, it isn't limited to quotes (although I foolishly focused on them in this answer) but to quotation marks and punctuation in general. Here's one reference I found: grammar-monster.com/lessons/…
    – terdon
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:12
  • @terdon so, should I create another question specifically about ruSO? Oct 25 '19 at 17:12
  • @Suvitruf as you wish, but I would say that if the page is in English, then English rules apply. And since SE uses EnUS conventions, then it should be consistent. If the page is in Russian, that's a very different proposition.
    – terdon
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:13
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    Both of the examples of UK punctuation in this answer are incorrect. It's a myth that in UK style, punctuation always goes outside; it doesn't. There are very specific guidelines. Even in UK English, the punctuation in these sentences should go inside the quotation marks. On the other hand, this answer is correct in terms of the question itself and the specific phrase being discussed. (I just wish you'd picked a legitimate example of UK punctuation.) Oct 25 '19 at 17:33
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    Note that even US programmers instinctively tend to follow the so-called UK conventions in this regard. That's because if they try the US style in computer code they naturally get syntax errors: ("foo," "bar," "glarch") is not a comma-separated list of strings. So they tend to retain logical quoting even when writing English not code.
    – tchrist
    Oct 25 '19 at 17:34
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    @terdon, no -- in UK English single and double quotes are both used -- which is used in any situation is a 'house style' matter. theguardian.com/media/mind-your-language/2011/may/19/… is good on punctuation for quotations (from other matter). Speech is handled slightly differently -- the punctation goes inside the quotation marks if it is effective part of what is said and not part of reporting it -- it that makes sense. So if somebody speaks a complete sentence, the final . goes within quotation marks. Oct 26 '19 at 7:35
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    @terdon No, I was not talking about single quotation marks at all. If the punctuation is part of the normal punctuation of what's being quoted, then it goes inside the quotation marks. For example: (1) "He ate three hot dogs", she said, "and then went home." (2) "He ate three dogs," she said, "in quick succession, and then went home." In (2), the unquoted sentence would be He ate three hot dogs, in quick succession, and then went home. Oct 26 '19 at 9:14
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    @terdon Because the comma is part of the syntax of the quoted text, the comma exists inside the quotation marks in the second version. In the first version, it's not part of the quoted text, so it exists outside the quotation mark. To avoid confusion, there are some other more specific things I didn't mention—but they don't apply to the examples here. Oct 26 '19 at 9:15
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    @terdon Additionally, and as an exception, a comma goes before the final quotation mark even if it's not part of the quoted text, if it's the final piece of quoted text in the main text itself. (1) "I will go," she said. But (2) "I will go", she said, "soon," and she left. In the second version, the comma inside in the second part is fine because it concludes the entirety of the quoted dialogue. Oct 26 '19 at 9:23
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    @terdon In short (the issue of single quotation marks aside), the specific sentences you picked are punctuated identically in both US and UK English. The UK version of the punctuation you give (the placement of the comma and period) is wrong. Oct 26 '19 at 9:23

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