-16

When looking at the edit review process, the reviewer stats say "has" against each person's username, but "had" against the editor's username. This should be changed to "has" as well because it's the best grammar for that sentence.

enter image description here

The error (in meaning) is even more pronounced in the pending edit view:

enter image description here

I have 2 approved edits right now. It doesn't mean that I had 2 approved edits at some unspecified time in the past, because if that was the case it implies that I no longer have 2 approved edits.

The grammar is not incorrect per se, but it has the wrong meaning. It is obvious that the context of the message is the present, so the present tense needs to be used, not the simple past tense.

The sentences are elided forms of:

CJ Dennis had 2 edit suggestions [which had been] approved, and 0 edit suggestions [which had been] rejected

But they should be elided forms of:

CJ Dennis has 2 edit suggestions [which have been] approved, and 0 edit suggestions [which have been] rejected

So, although the sentences as presented are in the simple past (had), they have elided parts which are in the past perfect tense (had been).

For those who think the current grammar is better, consider the following English SE posts:

  • "Had spent" vs. "has spent"

    Very briefly, and very generally, the present perfect construction is used to describe a past event that has current relevance. The past perfect construction is used to describe one past event that occurred before another. – Barrie England

    "has spent" is present perfect, "had spent" is past perfect. "has" describes a past event that has current relevance.

  • Where should we use 'has/have been' and 'had been'?

    The has/have been form is known as the present perfect and relates what has happened in the past to what is happening now. The had been form is known as the past perfect and pushes the events further back. It relates what happened at some time in the past to the situation at some other time in the past. – Barrie England

    I can perhaps add that the sentence "I had been at work for eight hours" is very unlikely to be said unless a past time focus has already been established in the discourse. So if it follows something like "Something strange happened to me yesterday" it would be normal, as would "I had been at work for eight hours when ... ". But the sentence "I had been at work for eight hours." is unlikely to start a conversation. – Colin Fine

    "I had been at work for eight hours" is very unlikely to be said unless a past time focus has already been established in the discourse.

Since the context of the edit summary is the present, the verb should be "has". If the context is changed to some time in the past, the verb should be "had". If the current context of the edit summary is not the present but instead the past, this is totally unclear to me and should be changed to make it clear.

CJ Dennis had 7 edit suggestions approved, and 0 edit suggestions rejected

When? Before what other event? Why not now (with "has")?

After a user's first edit is accepted, it says "CJ Dennis had 1 edit suggestion approved, and 0 edit suggestions rejected"

The number agrees with the present (present perfect), but the grammar is in the past (past perfect).

The grammar is unequivocally wrong and needs to change!


Better yet, as has been previously suggested, turn the whole thing into a table and bypass the grammar issue.

  • 4
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the assumption is false. X has 7 edit suggestions approved is ungrammatical when referring to a past event in the same way that the other sentences refer to a past event. It could be changed to the present-tense: X has 7 approved edit suggestions. But, if so, then the other sentences (for parallelism) would also need to change. The question of grammar belongs at English.SE. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Nov 5 '19 at 4:47
  • (Note the different location of the verb between the two formulations and that the first set of sentences uses the active voice, while the second uses the passive voice.) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Nov 5 '19 at 4:51
  • 1
    @JasonBassfordSupportsMonica I think the question that arises is what does it show the first time a user: 1. edits a post, 2. reviews a post? If it shows 1, the verb is "has". If it shows 0, the verb is "had". But the grammar still needs to be clear in either case. If you use "had" you must make it clear, either explicitly or by context, what the second past event was. The passive voice is a red herring. Passive voice doesn't change the tense of a sentence. "The dog has bitten the man." "The man has been bitten by the dog." "The dog had bitten the man." "The man had been bitten by the dog." – Cool Fool Nov 5 '19 at 4:56
  • 1
    Problem X (e.g. English) is not on topic here. This software (on topic) has problem X. Is it on topic or not? English wording improvements have been raised before, accepted, and implemented. This question has been put on hold for the wrong reason. – Cool Fool Nov 6 '19 at 2:32
  • 1
    I'm voting to reopen because this question is on topic (it is about the software that powers SE). Disagreement should not be expressed by voting to close. If there is a special rule on meta that allows this interpretation of a close vote (disagreement), if anyone can link to documentation of this, I'll retract my reopen vote. – De Novo Dec 4 '19 at 23:01
11

It isn't incorrect.

"Has" is a third-person singular and a present perfect tense, it refers to an action that began at some time in the past and is still in progress. The reviewers may or may not continue reviewing, the number could remain the same of increment.

"Had" is a past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural. The past perfect tense refers to something that began in the past and was still true at another time that also was in the past. The editor's review is completed, at that instant they "had" that many.

Source:

  • This is not true. If I make two edits in quick succession but one takes much longer to be reviewed than the other, the stats get updated in the meantime. The stats are what the user has at the time of viewing, not at the time of editing. Viewing past edit suggestions shows the current numbers of approved and rejected edits. – Cool Fool Dec 5 '19 at 22:45
4

The two reviewers have approved a number of edits in the past. That means, they have pressed the approved button in the past.

The user who has suggested the edit has had some of their reviews approved by other reviewers.

So the difference is that the stats on the reviewers refer to actions they took themselves whereas the stats on the editor refer to actions other reviewers have taken with respect to suggestions the editor has made in the past.

  • 1
    Now you're just making it more complicated! "has" vs "had" vs "has had"! I hope no-one mentions "had had"! – Cool Fool Nov 5 '19 at 6:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .