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For Spanish speaking users is not so simple. We don't have "he" or "she", we have programadores y programadoras, arquitectos y arquitectas, ....

We finish by using only masculine terms, because if not, as complained in this text a member of Spanish Royal Language Academy, this is what happens (I cannot translate this on a engine, try it if you wish):

«El pleno está integrado por el presidente o presidenta, el vicepresidente o vicepresidenta y los vocales o las vocales.» Ante ese párrafo pueden ocurrir dos cosas. Una es que parezca normal: de pura saturación terminas acostumbrándote a cualquier imbecilidad. La otra es que nos dé la risa floja. Al principio creí que era un texto chungo. Manipulado. Pero nada de eso: BOPV, ley 9/2004 de la Comisión Jurídica. «Se hace saber a los ciudadanos y ciudadanas», etcétera. Todo trufadito de perlas como ésta: «Un secretario o secretaria que se nombra por el presidente o presidenta (...) entre funcionarios y funcionarias». Y más adelante, con repetición exhaustiva de las titulares o los titulares, las vocales o los vocales, los presentes o las presentes, el secretario o la secretaria, el presidente o la presidenta, se detalla que en ausencia «de uno de los vocales o una de las vocales (...) se procederá al nombramiento de un suplente o una suplente (...). El nombramiento y cese del suplente o la suplente se realizará conforme a lo previsto (...). El tiempo que dure la suplencia se imputará al período de mandato de la vocal o el vocal suplido». Imagino que las feministas galopantes estarán goteando agua de limón con el texto, pero creo que aún podríamos afinar un poquito más. Porque observo cierto déficit de concordancia. Puestos o puestas a ello, «la vocal o el vocal suplido» debería haberse escrito «la vocal o el vocal suplido o suplida», o bien «la vocal o el vocal suplidos o suplidas». Y puestos a hilar fino, lo de «el tiempo que dure la suplencia» también era mejorable escribiendo «el tiempo que dure la suplencia o el suplencio». Pero en fin. Cada maestrillo tiene su librillo.

Arturo Pérez-Reverte. Las miembras y los miembros. El Semanal

I think SE should clarify this new policy for non-English languages such as Spanish.

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    We have the same "problem" here in France, and so-called inclusive writing is supposed to be the "solution". That's not very popular, though. – Frédéric Hamidi Nov 26 at 9:39
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    For those not in the loop (snicker) Perez-Reverte's article above is a jibe at the politically correct idea, popular at the time in Spain, of using both the masculine and the feminine of each plural noun every time it appeared, "for inclusiveness", instead of the neutral form, which is identical to the masculine. As one can see, it leads to ridiculously long walls of text that contain very little actual information, but maximize the amount of virtue signalling per line, which one might suspect was the actual goal all along. – AEhere supports Monica Nov 26 at 9:42
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    Possible duplicate of meta.stackexchange.com/q/336364/369802? It states: 6. How does this apply to languages other than English? While these specific requirements around pronoun usage apply only to the English language, the goal of being inclusive and respectful of all genders applies to all our communities. As we find best practices in other languages, we’ll work with those communities and update guidance for those languages. (though that doesn't say much about what it means, just that it still needs work) – Tinkeringbell Nov 26 at 10:08
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    In french, almost everything is strictly gendered. I am a feminism and a lot of us are not sold by inclusive writing. It is cumbersome. You can be inclusive by using more neutral words. At the end, I dont think it is a hill I will die for. There are better fight to do. – aloisdg says Reinstate Monica Nov 26 at 10:28
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    To change a language (spanish for example), the use of what is to be changed should be very extensive. That so called "inclusive language" is not, at all, it it doesn't seem it would be in a near future. And (this is my opinion) not necessary at all, because in spanish the masculine is the "gender neutral" (genero no marcado) that includes everyone. – Pikoh Nov 26 at 11:52
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    You can also include Portuguese on this question. – CaldeiraG Nov 26 at 11:56
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    German has the same problem, maybe with some different nuances. The typical solution is to use both versions: "Estimados programadores y estimadas programadoras ..." like. – Trilarion Nov 26 at 12:06
  • This has already received some discussion on the Meta site of Spanish Language spanish.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/3231/… – mdewey Nov 26 at 12:14
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    Possible duplicate of What does the Code of Conduct say about pronouns? – Mast Nov 26 at 12:40
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    I am not sure if I should accept the duplicate. The point 6 only says they are going to give specifical guideliness for every non-english language. I am asking specifically what are those guideliness.There is a big debate on Spain about how to apply to institutional language Equality Law for men and women. The company is from USA.I am asking how they are going to apply it if academics of Royal Spanish Academy say inclusive language cannot be performed so easy.Anyhow you know much more better than me how the site works and if it helps marck it as duplicate of the main post about pronouns. – user657339 Nov 26 at 12:49
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    To mix in another language: In German, the idea of using a "gender-neutral language" is not applicable. I mean, at all. Not the least. People are trying it, but the results are ridiculous abominations of the language that real people are speaking - in reality (you know, the thing where the pizza comes from). However, this is just a starter. People will insist of certain syntactical crutches, regardless of whether they make sense or not. – Marco13 Nov 27 at 0:53
  • SE don't care. Spain isn't the USA. Therefore they don't care. Sorry. – Lightness Races with Monica Dec 5 at 12:03
  • @Lightness Races with Monica Spain is only a little part of spanish speakers. We are in 50 million habitants while only Mexico has 150 or so.... – user657339 Dec 5 at 12:16
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    @Universal_learner Lots of Spanish speakers in the US as well. – anonymous Dec 5 at 12:53
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    @Universal_learner Yep, I'm saying, I agree. – Lightness Races with Monica Dec 6 at 11:09
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+500

Super briefly, the "pronouns policy" is if someone asks for a specific pronoun to be used when someone talks to/about him/her/them we should use it, that's it.

There are two sites on the network where Spanish is allowed. If someone ask us to use "él/ella/ello/elle" when talk to/about "él/ella/ello/elle" basically we have two options

  1. Use it
  2. Walk away

The same applies to sustantives, adjectives and other words, is someone asks to refer to "él/ella/ello" as "programador/programadora",

  1. Do it
  2. Walk away

Actually, there is a third option, ignore the request, but then your account could be suspended or if you are ♦ moderator, the ♦ and the related privileges could be removed too.

By the way, if you have questions about how to inflect your adjectives in Spanish we could ask about that in https://spanish.stackexchange.com


From answer by Cesar M one of the Community Managers, to What does the Code of Conduct say about pronouns?

What's this all about? - The Basics

This section is an explanation of singular third-person pronouns.

1. What's this business about "pronouns"?

It would be rude to refer to a man as "she" or a woman as "he". Some people are neither men nor women and might, for instance, ask to be referred to as "they". When someone indicates what pronouns should be used to refer to them, please use the pronouns they state as you would others.


6. How does this apply to languages other than English?

While these specific requirements around pronoun usage apply only to the English language, the goal of being inclusive and respectful of all genders applies to all our communities. As we find best practices in other languages, we’ll work with those communities and update guidance for those languages.

PS: I don't think that this month the CM will discuss the best practices in other languages. Please be patient.

References

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    The problem is that if someone asks me to use "ex" or some other neopronoun, how the heck do I inflect my adjectives? – Mark Nov 26 at 22:14
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    @Mark That is a good question for the corresponding language site (if there is any) – Rubén Nov 26 at 22:16
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    @Mark the same way the rest of us have to apparently. Say things that are awkward, clunky, and sure to offend someone (probably). – user623267 Nov 26 at 22:20
  • @Mark the wikipedia article contains some inflected adjectives in Spanish. – mdewey Dec 5 at 13:13
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How should the new pronoun policy be applied to Spanish language?

With uncertainty, since that is the new state of affairs in Stack Exchange...

For Spanish speaking users is not so simple. We don't have "he" or "she", we have programadores y programadoras, arquitectos y arquitectas, ....

Not as if it is simple for english either as recent events reveal. We do have he->el and she->ella in spanish. But I agree, it can get even more complicated for us.
We also have gendered articles. Consider the gender-neutral phrase "An electrician did that".

  • Male : "Un electricista hizo eso"
  • Female : "Una electricista hizo eso"
  • Non-binary, fluid or without gender : "?? electricista hizo eso."
  • Gender-neutral as per RAE(*) : "Un electricista hizo eso."
  • Gender-neutral promoted recently : "Un o una electricista hizo eso."

There is the non-academic Élle as a neo-pronoun for the 3rd case. But I have not found a spanish neo-article for the 3rd case.

I think SE should clarify this new policy for non-English languages such as Spanish.

I think there is no need for that. We've been fine without that clarification. Maybe the mods of the spanish site could clarify if they've ever had to deal with miss-gendering or non-inclusive issues. I've seen none and would rather not fix a community which is not broken.
Also, I have no confidence in the current management of SE. Even if there was a problem here to be solved I'd rather them not being the ones addressing it.

Let our mods deal with it.

(*) RAE means Real Academia Española (Royal Spanish Academy). An academic institution widely but not universally accepted as the primary reference for spanish language. Their current stance is that in spanish masculine form serves both the functions of masculine and gender-neutral. RAE monitors and frequently incorporates evolutions in the language. It is fine to deviate from RAE's dictionary if you have a good reason, even academics do so.

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    As a quite interesting additional example: A waiter did it (past tense). El camarero lo hizo. La camarera lo hizo. ?? camarer?? ?? hizo. – CptEric Nov 26 at 15:39
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    @Rubén Surely that should be une gloriose pronombre propueste para une electriciste nueve. :) – tchrist Nov 26 at 21:54
  • @tchrist Fortunately, regarding pronouns policy, the current SE sites that allows Spanish aren't about people jobs :D Anyway, just ask the user which article "él/ella/ello/elle" wants to be used when referring to "él/ella/ello/elle" – Rubén Nov 26 at 22:05
  • @Rubén Better hope they aren't un hombre o una mujer, un actor o una actriz, un rey o una reina who what you to go with that cursi (¿curse? :) ellé thinge then. :) – tchrist Nov 26 at 22:07
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    To respond to Maybe the mods of the spanish site could clarify if they've ever had to deal with miss-gendering or non-inclusive issues. In my years as a mod in that site it never was a problem. In fact, more problems (or the foreshadows of them) were created by the new (unclear, unpractical) policies + CoC. To this date it doesn't seem like a problem or even a concern. The main problem is that mods and users are unprepared to deal with any future problems and seemingly they have been given zero advice or support from the policy makers – Diego - Reinstate Monica Nov 27 at 15:06
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    Reverte would say "la electricista o el electricisto" :) – user657339 Nov 28 at 12:13

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