-9

It’s been a year since I had the honor to join Stack Overflow as CEO. We’ve made a lot of progress in that time, and also faced challenges unlike anything seen in our lifetimes. I’m immensely proud of the way we have pulled together as a company and a community.

You can check out my latest blog post here, and as always, I’ll try to spend the next day or two answering your questions here. We had some nice accomplishments in Q3 that directly impact our users. In my post, I also lay out our ambitious 2021 plans for growth.

7
  • 44
    I find it extremely ironic that you brag about how much the company has grown, but utterly neglect to mention how you've fired a non-negligible amount of SE staff. Also, Math Overflow isn't Stack Overflow - it's a part of the SE network, where as SO is just one specific site in the network. Pure math question are off-topic on SO. Oct 28, 2020 at 15:18
  • 7
    In August, when the 20 million non-deleted questions milestone was reached there was comparatively little interest in the event. This blog post acknowledges that milestone at least but a single number should always be seen with caution. Not all of these questions have positively scoring answers and what is the worth of a question without a good answer?
    – Trilarion
    Oct 29, 2020 at 20:23
  • Super ironic IMO. How did it take you and your staff half a decade to fix a review queue! And that fix was to change the text on buttons. Something is wrong in the inner workings of SE. But I do want to appreciate some things which you have done, so there's that.
    – 10 Rep
    Nov 9, 2020 at 19:38
  • 6
    @10Rep to be fair towards the CEO, he's working for SE for only one year. All the bugs and problems of SE that were before his arrival are not his fault at all. Nov 10, 2020 at 7:16
  • @Shadow10YearsWizard Did you read my last sentence?
    – 10 Rep
    Nov 10, 2020 at 17:00
  • 1
    @10Rep yes, I read it. What about it? Your comment contains two parts, I addressed the one blaming the CEO in something that isn't his fault. I did not address other parts. Nov 10, 2020 at 17:09
  • 2
    I'm so confused - where was the feedback on the responses? I could respect that you got busy but I was hoping to have some dialog on this.
    – Makoto
    Nov 12, 2020 at 16:18

8 Answers 8

47

Since Snowflake switched their tech support to Stack Overflow in 2019

They did not! They switched their technical Q&A site to Stack Overflow. That's a very important distinction.

Stack Overflow is not suited for tech support, and services using Stack Overflow for tech support is a repeating pattern that annoys the community a lot. It worries me that you're apparently unaware of this, while staffers often make considerable effort to contact these companies and get them to change their way.

A blog by the CEO discussing awesome results when moving tech support to Stack Overflow is 100% not what we need.

4
  • 7
    You are right Erik A, they switched their technical Q&A to SO, not tech support. We've updated the post to be more accurate. I do feel that companies asking users to post technical questions on Stack Overflow with proper tags can be a good thing, so long as they learn the rules of the community and ensure questions are properly scoped and on topic. Oct 29, 2020 at 19:15
  • 19
    @PrashanthChandrasekar Honestly, that never worked well. First, companies don't explain properly what kind of questions are appropriate on SO. Users that are not already familiar with the site are asking totally off topic questions, saying company redirected them to SO. Users that already know SO, don't need redirection. It is a nightmare. It can work for very limited number of companies that are dedicated to providing quality answers to quality questions on SO and those are scarce. The rest just wants to offload their need for support team. 1/2 Oct 30, 2020 at 7:02
  • 15
    Even if they have someone answering on SO, those people are also inexperienced users, posting answers to off topic questions making moderation harder. I wish you would stop bragging about companies using SO as tech support. Renaming to technical Q/A does not help much because of previously mentioned reasons. 2/2 Oct 30, 2020 at 7:05
  • 6
    I'll note that I was not impressed by the Stack Overflow knowledge/training of the "Snowflake Community Moderators" that suddenly started answering questions here earlier this year. Lots of not-an-answers: stackoverflow.com/a/59669912/1265393
    – pkamb
    Oct 30, 2020 at 17:42
45

Our community team also put tremendous effort into a Ticket Smash event, working our way through a backlog of requests, bugs, and fixes. We made it through all 631 tickets in those two weeks. The team worked on issues that our moderators escalated and got a much better understanding of what our moderators face every day. Their tireless work on behalf of the network is always awe inspiring.

It's an awkward point to harp on - as someone who both works with parts of the community team in my role as a volunteer, as well as someone who's aspired (and has had several applications in for the role, including one for the current opening) to be part of the community team, but...

While I do realise the point of the blog is to celebrate wins, current and future, I don't think that we've gotten to the point where the community is appreciated or understood enough.

We got to over 600 tickets, nearly all high priority moderator escalations (and we try to keep this to the minimum), simply because there were not enough folks dealing with it. There weren't enough folks because we kept losing folks to attrition or downsizing and they were never really replaced.

We've lost three extremely experienced CMs and their familiarity with the brand of community management and communication that was a hallmark of much of the last decade.

That they cleared out all those tickets was a win, but that the team was stretched too thin and the tickets piled up is worth considering.

With respect to how we see folks in the company, see the community team...

The original job ad for the new community managers had this requirement:

3-5 years in a similar community facing role within an organization with millions of users

The sort of places that deal with millions of users have rather appalling working conditions for folks dealing with community, and deal with content moderation. Consider Facebook's model of using contract sweatshops for content moderation. Y'all are going to find better fits in small places.

The current requirement is:

At least 3-5 years of professional community management experience for a large technologically-focused user base

Which rules out a lot of great folks within the community.

Contrast this with the description on a broadly similar role on Reddit, for the role of "Anti-Evil Operations specialist

3-4 year relevant work experience in Internet industry, social media, and online communities as a user, moderator or manager

It's open to folks who've done moderation anywhere. While I'm not a redditor, in theory it's open to me. It's nice, inclusive wording that would allow great folks from Stack Exchange and elsewhere to know they can apply.

Digital foundry has had an actual community manager role up on march 2021 screenshot here] that lists

"Established track record of participation in the Foundry Virtual Tabletop community."

as a requirement. I'm hoping that its very least an alternative to formal community management experience. It certainly reflects that part of the industry is willing to consider hiring from within the community, though I leave it to others more well versed in the field to whether its an industry norm.

The opening of community manager roles is typically a matter of great excitement for the moderator community, and this time the response was underwhelming. Stack Exchange had many great community managers who were not from techie backgrounds, and many who were. I wouldn't knock the professionals, but it's worth remembering that you have a diverse pool of folks who actually get the network y'all ruled out. Even if you're hiring someone with professional CM experience, a great candidate may not be from a technology background.

Some CMs understand the problems moderators face because they were moderators. Others have figured it out by working with us. They don't need the ticket smash to understand our issues. They listen to us - and we need folks to listen to them.

I'd say a good chunk of great historic CMs were non technical, or drawn from non technical communities. It feels that this is disregarded, and it gates out lots of great folks. CMs deal with human beings, not just tech workers.

I'd like to bring up the fact that we still haven't really actually gotten around to topping up our CMs yet even if there's an ad. I'm looking forward to when Stack Exchange does so.

I'd also point out a lot of our communities are not technical, and yet there's overlap, and a certain amount of ownership with our technical communities. People do stuff other than code/work and this keeps them on the network.

We've gotten somewhere, but there's a great amount of work to do - both in terms of rebuilding trust and getting the relationship with the community back on track. If y'all want to connect to the community, you need to demonstrate you understand the folks who have, and do interface with it.

Looking back at the last decade - I'd reiterate what I said back in May 2020, that y'all need to ensure that your revenue generating business units are self sustaining, and that community isn't seen as a "cost center" to be cut whenever one of those units needs more resources.

14
  • 17
    When I saw the CM job ad I originally suspected that SE might have clarified internally that experience as a moderator here would count for that requirement. I wasn't very optimistic on this, but I didn't fully expect that SE would essentially exclude hiring from the mod pool entirely. Oct 28, 2020 at 17:52
  • 3
    I'll also add that most of SE's job listings have historically contained the line that "even if you don't fully meet the requirements, you should apply anyway", but the new CM listings tellingly didn't include this line. Oct 29, 2020 at 0:17
  • 4
    Well I threw in my hat anyway, as a mod on a bigger technical site. Still unsure of the outcome. I would feel that we don't just need to be in a position where mods are welcome to apply - but where the role is attractive again. I'm unsure how the interest level would be, looking at the events of the past 2 years
    – Journeyman Geek Mod
    Oct 29, 2020 at 0:32
  • 12
    @JourneymanGeek I'm actually pretty surprised that you're willing to try this at all. My impression was that almost all mods that previously expressed interest in a CM position were pretty definite on not even considering it now, and I found that to be an entirely understandable change. So while I think for SE it would be good to also hire from the mod pool, I wasn't sure there were any mods willing to try this at all. Oct 29, 2020 at 7:48
  • 3
    I had very convincing people nagging me :D
    – Journeyman Geek Mod
    Oct 29, 2020 at 8:34
  • 3
    1/ Hello Journeyman Geek. Nice to hear from you. Thanks for your input. I spent my first quarter getting to know the team, meeting with customers and the community --- to understand the current state. My second quarter was focused on hiring for some key leadership positions to help us scale in the coming years. By the middle of my second quarter, the pandemic changed the landscape (we were affected like most companies in the world) and we were thrilled to raise our new round of funding to have the resources we need to continue scaling. Oct 29, 2020 at 17:46
  • 5
    2/ I agree with you, there is a lot more we can do celebrate and understand our community. We have been releasing the community roadmap so you can hold us accountable to our promises. We are hiring on the community side, and while we may encourage applicants with certain experience, we do consider all resumes. Finding the best candidates takes time, especially with so much of everyday life still turbulent. Rest assured, I consider the community the foundation and vital part of Stack and plan to continue investing in its health and growth. Oct 29, 2020 at 17:46
  • 12
    I would suggest a good start might be to consider requirements on future CM ads that open up the role explicitly to mods or even members of the community at large. I suspect with recent events - your candidate pool might not be as large as it used to be but it would be nice to make a start now, in view of better days
    – Journeyman Geek Mod
    Oct 29, 2020 at 23:00
  • 1
    @PrashanthChandrasekar Good to know! It's just that in the past, SE has put out job advertisements privately to network moderators first prior to releasing them to the general public, and I see why the company decided to just publicly release them first this time. By the way, it would be nice if you added in the line about "you should apply anyway even if you don't meet all the requirements" that has historically been present in SE job listings but was omitted from the CM listing. Oct 31, 2020 at 20:58
  • 4
    A little late - but consider this listing on reddit - while its "anti evil operations", the job scope is roughly comparable to what our community managers end up doing. They talk about "3-4 year relevant work experience in Internet industry, social media, and online communities as a user, moderator or manager". Its a highly inclusive wording - heck, I'm eligible as per that and I'm not even a redditor.
    – Journeyman Geek Mod
    Nov 1, 2020 at 13:45
  • @sonic ... Maybe? But not for the last five years. When I applied there was no advanced notice at all.
    – Catija StaffMod
    Nov 2, 2020 at 5:10
  • @Catija It has definitely existed in the past, though. Nov 2, 2020 at 5:12
  • ... OK? I... don't see how that says we actually ever did it (though I'm aware some CMs were hired without there even being a job posting) and... as I said, we haven't done it in the last five years, so... @sonic .... Yeah, it'd be nice... but... it's not really necessary.
    – Catija StaffMod
    Nov 2, 2020 at 5:16
  • 4
    Just to clarify this point, @SonictheK-DayHedgehog - Tim maybe felt that hiring from the mod teams was a good idea, but it has never been policy. Indeed, this would not be the first time that a position was aimed specifically at external folks, although in past situations the team was much larger.
    – Shog9
    Nov 2, 2020 at 16:02
22

I'm not sure if it's just me, but the communities section of this article feels... hollow. The landmark examples provided:

  • highlight.js (which is largely an implementation detail to most)
  • Ticket smash
  • Racial equity effort, which is largely an internal effort
  • diversity & inclusion as a footnote

It feels like a lot of the important topics, the ones that actually were key to building bridges, were either footnotes (the diversity & inclusion part) or missed entirely (the renewed elections, mod/CM interactions, the response to the lavender letter).

As a result, I'm sorry, but I'll give you the same feedback I gave you six months ago: it felt like release notes and missed some of the events that most of us would call important, preferring a technical choice over them.

9
  • 3
    I mean... i'd rather it be even less than a foot note personally, can't please everyone.
    – Kevin B
    Oct 28, 2020 at 18:31
  • 4
    @user400654 my issue is that there have been so many more impactful events/changes than highlight.js, the lavender letter answer being the prime example of this. A huge part of what actually happened with respect to the community is not even mentioned, almost as if whoever wrote this... wasn't actually interacting, directly or indirectly, with what they were writing about. Oct 28, 2020 at 18:43
  • 4
    iunno... to me it feels like the only "positive" change the past 2 years was the realization that meta was more than just the 0.015%. Oh, and close votes on SO going down to 3.
    – Kevin B
    Oct 28, 2020 at 18:51
  • @user400654 Those aren't mentioned either. Great reminder, though; will add them to my answer! Oct 28, 2020 at 19:05
  • 6
    @SébastienRenauld this post only refers to events from Q3, those two items are both from Q1.
    – Yaakov Ellis StaffMod
    Oct 28, 2020 at 19:29
  • It just didn't happen much in the last quarter for public Q&A and I also wouldn't expect many tangible changes with high impact in the next quarters.
    – Trilarion
    Oct 29, 2020 at 11:50
  • 5
    The thanks feature experiment seems to have been buried silently.
    – Trilarion
    Oct 29, 2020 at 15:18
  • 2
    What becomes clear from the Teams account is that Teams need to organize their Qs beyond simple tags. I guess that articles is something like a wiki page, a collection of references to Qs. Maybe we should think about if public Q&A also could need an additional organization structure.
    – Trilarion
    Oct 29, 2020 at 15:33
  • @SébastienRenauld - thanks for expressing your concern. You can look at the update we provided in this week's Loop blog post for more details on how we are working with the community. We continue to make steady progress. Through user research and community feedback we made improvements to our review queue help pages. The CEO blog post I produce quarterly has to cover a lot of ground. Some of it is focused on community, some on public platform, and some on the business. For these different pieces to succeed, they all need to grow and improve in tandem. In the end, they all support one another. Nov 19, 2020 at 17:01
18

No, seriously. Was the point of this whole engagement with New York students about user retention or not? Because what I'm quoting below and what Sara is remarking to in comments diverges.

The challenges we face today as a result of the pandemic are acutely felt by students and recent graduates who are trying to complete their education or find a start to their careers. We know from our Developer Survey and social media that our public site is utilized actively by students learning to code, and we wanted to learn from them as well. New York City’s Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) is the nation’s largest youth employment program, historically connecting NYC youth between the ages of 14 and 24 with career exploration opportunities and paid work experience each summer. Stack Overflow recently took part in SYEP’s Summer Bridge 2020, helping a cohort of young learners to get first-hand experience with the tech industry.

Many of these young learners have visited our sites when they needed help with a technical problem, but not as many had taken the next step of contributing their own questions and answers. We asked them to form groups and present us with ideas for how to increase participation. We are considering their suggestions for educational content and working to make the rules of our communities more transparent and accessible.

Additionally, we have this quote in the New York Times about how Stack Overflow is cited as a place to learn code.

The New York Times cited us as a place to learn, network, and search for new employment opportunities.

In the article itself...

There are a plethora of professional and interest-based organizations online to join. A few Ms. Kalinowski recommends are Fairy Godboss and Power to Fly, which connect women with job openings and career advice, and Stack Overflow for software developers to learn and share programming knowledge, and check out job openings.

Is this what we want Stack Overflow to be known as, without actually getting into the real and readily applicable fine print about what we - the actual community of Stack Overflow that is being showcased here - expect of someone who either wants to share knowledge or learn programming?

12
  • 1
    // Stack Overflow for software developers to learn and share programming knowledge, and check out job openings. // Is there something bad about that? Is it wrong for a new developer to use a Q&A site to search for relevant IT jobs? Oct 28, 2020 at 18:53
  • 17
    @Mari-LouA if they click ask question to do so, then yes, that is wrong and bad.
    – rene
    Oct 28, 2020 at 18:55
  • @Mari-LouA: I'm squinting right now and I can't tell if you're being facetious. But I do see some irony in that you use a Q&A site to search for work. I didn't explicitly call Jobs out though; that largely lives tucked somewhere neatly in the corner and doesn't harm Q&A.
    – Makoto
    Oct 28, 2020 at 18:55
  • 1
    Is it bad that SO is a repository site for experts but which also helps out new developers? No, this is not a facetious question. I ask because from your answer, it seems you are criticising the company for making this their goal. P.S Not my DV, I haven't voted any posts so far. I want to understand more. Oct 28, 2020 at 19:02
  • 15
    Nothing outside of the quotes mentions anything about not wanting young people participating. We simply want people to be made aware of what is expected of them to participate effectively, rather than being blanketly told they can "come here and learn/grow" only to be blindsided with downvotes when they ask a question that isn't a good fit.
    – Kevin B
    Oct 28, 2020 at 21:15
  • 5
    @user400654: Finally! Someone gets me!!
    – Makoto
    Oct 28, 2020 at 21:25
  • 1
    Ideally, without just removing said blindsiding downvotes ;)
    – Kevin B
    Oct 28, 2020 at 21:26
  • @rene I waited before responding because I thought it best to ignore it. FYI, I have had an account on SO for several years, I am well aware of its products, and how developers and engineers etc. can apply to jobs, I am not stupid. That Makoto found my inquiry to be possibly faecetious but not your response is pretty telling about how some SO users treat and view "outsiders". Oct 29, 2020 at 8:34
  • 3
    @Mari-LouA I know you're not stupid and value your often clarifying contributions. I simply didn't get this one and thought I could lure you in elaborating a bit by making it obvious that it is easy to use the wrong features for new users to the site. SO as a q/a model hard to get into as an outsider, mainly because we have barriers that almost all other community driven sites are missing. I agree with you that outsiders get a rough treatment, also by me. That is not primarily my fault, that is also due to the lack of boarding and mixed messages SE sends. I apologize to you for my comment.
    – rene
    Oct 29, 2020 at 8:48
  • 2
    In a way it's true. SO is a platform to learn. Everyday I learn something new here. Formally what they write isn't wrong. However it quickly and unequivocally becomes wrong if you are a beginner and see SO as main resource for learning. If you can't search well or can't formulate a clear question or just don't bother, SO isn't the right thing. SO isn't just for asking questions, it's for asking questions that haven't been asked before. Somehow I doubt that the company truly stands behind that. It's sad because it will lead to lots of unnecessary misery in the future.
    – Trilarion
    Oct 29, 2020 at 15:07
  • 1
    @Mari-LouA: I honestly thought you were half-joking. Q&A and jobs aren't related but Stack Exchange has brought them together. Back before Careers (and now Jobs) was a thing, Q&A was just Q&A and it was fine. Then, the company needed to start turning a profit, and they brought it here. It does feel kinda weird if you were to ask me earnestly about it, that somehow Stack Overflow - a place to get questions answered, generally - is also a place to get a job.
    – Makoto
    Oct 29, 2020 at 15:30
  • 11
    It's a marketing ploy. "Stackoverflow" (the Q&A to be clear) is/was wildly successful. Making "Stackoverflow" also refer to the paid products makes it easy to just lump them in with the "success" and use the Q&A's metrics to parrot why the paid products are worth putting money on the table for. In other words, taking advantage of all the hard work we've put into curating the place for their profit... all while promoting initiatives/ideals that push those same people away
    – Kevin B
    Oct 29, 2020 at 15:34
16

Putting the user journey front and center lets us leverage the strength we have as an organization – learning and feedback from our public community.

My perspective is that the company has not, at least over the past several years, done a particularly good job of using "learning and feedback from our public community". In particular, the set of various issues and events starting from over a year ago (e.g., the Code of Conduct update, Monica's "firing" and the generally inept handling of this afterwards, dealing with content licensing updates, etc., with a good outline at Firing mods and forced relicensing: is Stack Exchange still interested in cooperating with the community?) actually showed, to me, the opposite.

To be fair, this started before you joined the company, although it also did continue while you were CEO. In addition, losing several experienced Community Managers (CM's), who are IMHO crucial for the company to be able to able to effectively learn and use feedback from the public community, has made it even harder to accomplish.

However, the company's displayed attitude towards the community has generally improved since then, for which I assume a fair amount of credit goes to you. Nonetheless, I don't think it's at the stage yet where you can claim your statement that how the company deals with the public community is that much of a "strength", although I hope the trajectory of improvements (e.g., the process of hiring at least one, and hopefully more later, CM) will continue so that statement will become more and more applicable & appropriate in the future.

1
  • 1
    They have read the letters, meta posts and comments from passionate users. Maybe it's the initial stage of leveraging the feedback. Next time even more could happen.
    – Trilarion
    Oct 29, 2020 at 15:14
10

The blog post seems to be about a company and/or product called StackOverflow for Teams, about its prospects as a startup venture, and about a community (Who is that? Users of StackOverflow for Teams?)

There is little that remains recognizable to me from the StackExchange and StackOverflow community in which I was active from 2009 to 2019. Not sure why we are even included at all anymore.

1
  • 2
    "why we are even included at all anymore" - possible revenue aka potential buyers of Teams. :) Nov 4, 2020 at 15:44
-6

Could the company consider making a YouTube video where some of the staff members introduce themselves and say: "Hi"?

I know this is a lot to ask, but a slightly informal introduction would be lovely and I'd like to know how the staff members are beyond what we see on their profile page.

10
  • 7
    Even better: make funny GIF animation for each employee who agree to do it. Oct 28, 2020 at 15:45
  • 1
    @Shadow10YearsWizard First: Happy Meta Decade! Second, um, will the GIFs become the base for a competition?
    – Ollie
    Oct 28, 2020 at 15:47
  • 6
    @Ollie can be! Or just to revive the deceased team page... you can see past animations here. Oct 28, 2020 at 15:52
  • 2
    Anybody who hasn't checked the GIFs Shadow Wizard just linked I recommend doing so.
    – bad_coder
    Oct 28, 2020 at 15:54
  • 2
    // Anybody who hasn't checked the GIFs Shadow Wizard just linked I recommend doing so // Comment with GIFs link is, presumably, deleted. At the very least, I can't see it in the comment section. I can't imagine that the short introductions would be any fun, revealing, or honest. The SE videos that are present on YouTube look lacklustre and "fake". Yes, I am judging a book by its cover, there's a reason why the phrase is popular, it's because first impressions do matter. The low view confirms the impression. Oct 28, 2020 at 18:46
  • 5
    In comparison to all of the other things that staff could be doing right now, this just feels so inconsequential. Heck, they had to pause their roadmap because they had too many tickets to deal with! Why would we want them to do things that aren't value-add?
    – Makoto
    Oct 28, 2020 at 18:50
  • 2
    @Mari-LouA the URL to the GIFs is at the end of the 3rd comment from the top. (Regarding the videos those are incredibly hard to make because they'll simultaneously have a corporate and a personal dimension. I don't consider a corporate presentation necessarily fake -as you deem it- nor a personal dimension necessarily unprofessional. There's a fine line to be struck there and if you check personal videos from Nobel laureates or relevant figures they'll get a few thousands views at best...)
    – bad_coder
    Oct 28, 2020 at 18:53
  • 2
    Thanks for pointing out the link, I had better start wearing stronger glasses! Oct 28, 2020 at 18:55
  • 5
    @bad_coder there is the Stack Overflow Podcast where you can hear some of the staff members speak, that might be a way to get to know them better.
    – Marijn
    Oct 29, 2020 at 10:36
  • 2
    Thanks for the suggestion @bad_coder. We have been inviting staff on the podcast and encouraging to contribute to the blog. You can find interviews and articles featuring staff members here and here. When we get back to normal working conditions, we can consider trying to craft more video content featuring staff as well. Nov 6, 2020 at 15:18
-13

Thank you for being one of the places this past year where people can still get high quality answers to questions! Although they're busy contributing rather than creating problems, the people doing meaningful work are definitely the majority here.

7
  • 2
    @Rob C'mon... that's just... not really helpful here. This is specifically feedback on the question, which is allowed on meta sites. This isn't thanking an answer.
    – Catija StaffMod
    Nov 9, 2020 at 16:50
  • 4
    @Catija, the comment (which you deleted) says no such thing. Following the instructions provided for reviewing it is exactly correct, I take reviews seriously and am careful to review correctly.
    – Rob
    Nov 9, 2020 at 18:18
  • 7
    @Catija I have to agree with Rob here. (I was also the one who put up the VLQ flag.) This is a thanks, that could have been posted as a comment just fine. There is no need for anyone to actually respond to this, so there is no benefit in having this as an answer. That this is a post by the CEO makes no difference in that matter.
    – Luuklag
    Nov 9, 2020 at 19:20
  • 5
    @Luuklag You need a token amount of reputation to leave a comment. In my opinion, everyone would have been better served by a moderator flag asking to convert this to a comment. When people complain about Meta feeling toxic, this is the sort of stuff that fuels it. When someone is trying to participate in a way that is technically wrong, but not malicious, maybe pause a second and think about how the problem can be solved without rubbing their nose in it.
    – ColleenV
    Nov 10, 2020 at 13:19
  • 4
    @ColleenV except that such flags would most likely be declined: We're not here to help people circumvent system restrictions by converting answers to comments. As far as I know, that functionality mainly exists for when OPs don't comment on their own posts but write answers instead of comments. It's not meant to help people circumvent system restrictions.
    – Tinkeringbell Mod
    Nov 10, 2020 at 13:28
  • 4
    @Tinkeringbell The purpose of any tool in a mod's toolbox is to do things to help the community they moderate. Luuklag said they thought this answer would be more appropriate as a comment. This is a discussion and people are getting redirected here from the CEO's blog. We are happy to hear your comment below or in our discussion post on Meta Stack Exchange. Except when they get here, we are not happy to hear their comments. We argue about how they're not writing "real" answers and then refuse to take any action to improve their experience because "reasons". That's toxic.
    – ColleenV
    Nov 10, 2020 at 14:15
  • 3
    @ColleenV I'm not arguing whether this a real answer or not, I'm only saying that it's not going to be converted to a comment, because it certainly isn't a legitimate comment due to the reputation score of the person that posted this. Deliberately circumventing the restrictions of a community is just as toxic of a behavior. I would be doing that if I were to convert answers like this to comments. I would also be enabling toxic behavior that ignores the system restrictions. I can't put this as a comment on the blog post, where commenting as far as I remember doesn't require any reputation...
    – Tinkeringbell Mod
    Nov 10, 2020 at 15:26

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .