4

With the release of the 1.1 API (thanks, btw), StackApps has grown a default landing page that I really don't care about. I go to StackApps to discuss the API, not see the list of libraries. Frankly, I don't care about the libraries and apps, because I work on my own (StackKit).

As such, when I go to http://stackapps.com, I have to spend the extra time clicking from the "Apps" area to the "Active" area. This is especially annoying when I click the "StackApps" logo.

Can there be a way for me to say "my default landing page is 'Active' and not 'Apps'"?

  • 4
    +1 this is much needed – Jonathan. Feb 12 '11 at 20:24
3

Here is a Greasemonkey script to accomplish this.

  • +1 cool, I've never used greasemonkey before, but this is pretty neat. I suppose a SafariExtension could probably do the same thing. – Dave DeLong Feb 12 '11 at 21:24
  • @Dave: Actually, it's possible to install GreaseMonkey scripts in Safari by using GreaseKit. – uɐɯsO uɐɥʇɐN Feb 12 '11 at 23:12
  • @George yeah, some googling revealed that. I decided to try the extension approach since it's the native solution for my browser. (I did install GreaseKit, and Simon's script works perfectly, but I prefer the extension) – Dave DeLong Feb 13 '11 at 2:46
3

In general the sites keep track of which tab you last visited, so that should be allowed for stackapps as well.

Until then, change your bookmark to https://stackapps.com/?tab=active and when you start typing "sta..." into your addressbar, you might have to press the down arrow a few more times to hit https://stackapps.com/?tab=active rather than https://stackapps.com/ (although if that's not appearing in your address bar history you may need to train it by manually entering https://stackapps.com/?tab=active a few times)

  • What if we're using Lynx? – uɐɯsO uɐɥʇɐN Feb 12 '11 at 23:13
  • @George Then you should be using the Column 80 stack exchange interface, and should request a similar feature there if it's still a problem. – Adam Davis Feb 13 '11 at 23:17
1

Simon Brown's suggestion works, and if you use Safari, you could make an extension to do it (I'm a fan of native solutions):

  1. Safari's Develop menu > Show Extension Builder
  2. Add a new extension and change the name and identifier to something relevant
  3. Open your editor of choice and create a new .js file in the .safariextension folder of your new extension
  4. Put the following in the script, then save and close:

    var tab = safari.application.activeBrowserWindow.activeTab();
    if (tab.url == "http://stackapps.com/") {
        tab.url = "http://stackapps.com/?tab=active";
    }
    
  5. Back in the extension builder, click the "New Script" button next to "Start Scripts:"

  6. From the menu that just showed up, choose the script you just created.
  7. Click the "Install" button
  • You should check out NinjaKit—it's an Extension that adds GreaseMonkey functionality to Safari 5. Good stuff. – Dori Feb 13 '11 at 10:46

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .