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Results tagged with Search options user 14148

For questions regarding the nature of a "question" on Stack Exchange sites; e.g. how to ask, whether specific questions are appropriate, etc.

38
votes
It seems to me that there's gradations to this. There's cases where the poster is trying to do something he or she really shouldn't, whether illegal or immoral or thoroughly unwise. I tend to mentio …
answered Jul 24 '09 by David Thornley
1
vote
I'd rather see separate questions. Each question has a title, and the title should be meaningful. It should describe the question so that a reader is likely to know whether the question is … interesting or not. If there's two questions in one, what do we put in the title? If it's not excessively long, it's likely to be confusing or uninformative about at least one of the questions. …
answered Aug 7 '09 by David Thornley
2
votes
To oversimplify, there are two types of questioners. One will pay attention to guidelines, and will almost certainly have learned to ask good questions already. Therefore, there's no point in … guidelines, and for them we need to keep guidelines short. I don't think this belongs in quick guidelines, since I've seen a lot more questions with insufficient information than I've seen asking the …
answered Oct 4 '09 by David Thornley
5
votes
Right now, it's easier to gain rep by answering questions on popular topics. These are also the sorts of questions that are likely to get upvoted. I don't think we need to increase the rep gained … on popular topics versus unpopular topics. Nor do I think it would be good for getting questions answered, regardless of topic. People looking for rep wouldn't answer a wide variety of questions
answered Nov 10 '09 by David Thornley
4
votes
If you're going to edit it like that, rather than ask another question, make it clear that you did it. You changed the question, and only mentioned the change in a comment. Something like: "What's …
answered Dec 3 '09 by David Thornley
3
votes
The Electorate badge rewards voting on questions as well as answers (or, for people who have voted a whole lot on answers, questions rather than answers). Granted that it doesn't have to be upvotes … , we lose a small amount of rep for downvotes, and it feels nicer to upvote than downvote. I agree in general that questions are less valuable than answers, but discouraging upvoting them is not, apparently, the solution. Perhaps question upvotes should get less rep than answer upvotes. …
answered Feb 19 '10 by David Thornley
0
votes
I've answered lots of bad questions. I do feel a little funny about answering a question I'm voting to close, though. …
answered Sep 1 '09 by David Thornley
0
votes
In SO, we have a lot of questions, which are tolerated, about tools for programming. Apparently, these are tolerated as long as they're software tools or methodologies or nonphysical things like … ratio up. I don't think a SE site about the right computer would attract people who know what to recommend. It would fill up with questions (many somewhat inane) and no knowledgeable answers. This …
answered Aug 27 '10 by David Thornley
11
votes
Raymond link (the www.catb.orb one) in the question. It's got an excellent guide to the mindset needed to ask good questions, even if the examples given are all Greek to you. Tag the question with …
answered Apr 21 '09 by David Thornley
1
vote
like helping the original lazy sod, I'm very likely helping others later on. There are questions asked due to lack of effort that annoy me. Questions where there isn't enough information to answer … , questions where the questioner wants me to code something for them, questions that are hundreds of lines of code with an indication as to what goes wrong somewhere in there. These don't give me the feeling that somebody's going to benefit down the line from my answer, and so I tend to not answer those. …
answered Dec 4 '09 by David Thornley