19

For me, adding alt text is really important. Historically I didn't understand why it was important but I've since learned better - people accessing the site using screen readers or otherwise text-only should have the best experience that we can offer them, so if you're editing someone's work that has an image and the alt text is the default, it's very much ...


16

That picture is absolutely possible to describe. Imagine that someone says to you, "I can't see that picture; what is it?" Would you really tell them "I don't know how to put it into words, it's completely impossible to describe"? No, you'd tell them what it is. So do that. In fact, the picture contains a description of itself, so you can just use that. ...


15

I think this is a great idea. With the current implementation, this tool, which is the most convenient way to add images to posts, leads to a default behavior of not including an alt-text, which is an important element for readers who are visually impaired as well as for search-ability. Once the user has finished using the tool, the image is added, and the ...


14

My suggestion: let the user put the description in the image uploader itself: After selecting or dragging (or pasting) an image, the field will be auto focused. The initial text there is a placeholder only, which won't be used as the actual description, same way for example as the "Search Q&A" placeholder text in the search box on top. After ...


13

The queries that Michael Mrozek ran against SO content in April '11 take too long to run today. Instead, here are the current figures for UX.SE, which may be the community most likely to be aware of the need to put meaningful alt text: 6356 posts with alt text of "enter image description here" 189 posts with containing "alt text" (Some of these posts are ...


9

Better to leave it there. If you have no value to add, no point editing it and bumping it. We can't fix it all, only where it counts and editing out the text ... well leaves a big nothing there over "The user didn't know how best to use alt text" That said the words in bold look like a perfect start for an image description. Where you can't effectively say ...


9

Consider switching to the mobile web interface (by clicking the "mobile" link in the page footer). I just tested it (by turning images off in my Firefox for Android), and it seems to be fully functional even without images. As a bonus, the mobile view is optimized for low-bandwidth mobile connections, so it's likely to load faster than the usual desktop ...


9

Yup, busted!


9

result in undesirable or unexpected behavior? Consider the idea is screenreaders should be able to read it, and it should describe the image. You're probably better off not using many of these Emoji πŸ€” π–€π–“π–Žπ–ˆπ–”π–‰π–Š 𝖋𝖔𝖗 π–˜π–Žπ–’π–šπ–‘π–†π–™π–Žπ–“π–Œ π–‹π–†π–“π–ˆπ–ž π–‹π–”π–“π–™π–˜ ssǝuıןןıs ɹǝΙ₯Κ‡o ΙΉO Of course Zalgo text, a thing so horrible I'm hiding it under a ...


8

Fixed, thank you. It was pulling the first name from the author list and using it everywhere!


8

Requesting alt text in the image-upload GUI, as per this proposal, would be an effective and natural way to encourage people to enter meaningful alt text, especially if it comes with a well-crafted explanation of what is needed and why.


6

I've bountied this because it remains a problem (as running this query on any site indicates). I think the fundamental issue is that "enter image description here" is non-functional as a "placeholder" alt text. It is not useful to site visitors who cannot access visual content for whatever reason; in fact, it is negatively useful because ...


6

Marked this as status-deferred. We've had some internal discussions regarding doing an accessibility audit, but this isn't yet a concrete roadmap item. We'll review this request in more depth at a later date in the context of other accessibility issues.


4

I generally don't add any alt text to images here on SE. But that doesn't mean that I write inaccessible posts. In most cases when I use images, they're for illustration, and if they contain important information that is also present in the main text of the post. The main goal is to make the post usable even if you can't view the images. Image descriptions ...


4

Aside from the question about whether such a thing is useful or not, this is also something you can fix yourself relatively easy. For example you can load this style in your browser: .vote-up-off, .vote-down-off { text-indent: 0; font-size': 14px; } or if you need more jQuery (we all need more jQuery!): $('.vote-up-off, .vote-down-off').css({'text-...


4

I posited a similar question to chat some years ago as I was finding myself creating somewhat elaborate bits of text to describe the picture in the eponymous thousands words or so. I was informed that that was bad form (screen readers sometimes read all of that text in an unskippable manner, and most people won't see it), so most of mine (on the SF&F SE) ...


2

It would be nice to see it, but there is an issue with this... Very few people add meaningful image description text. The search could look like this: On Meta SE (here) there are 8098 with the default of "enter image description here" - which is quite a lot.


2

EDIT: Catija says the same thing, but much better. The only useful thing here is the last paragraph, about using alt="" for images that contain no useful information. Think about the purpose of "alt" text. There are two common situations where it is used: The person reading the web page has a visual impairment, making it difficult or impossible for them ...


2

I am wondering which problem you are trying to solve. The content of images are just loaded once, every time the browser asks the server if they have been updated (and they have a 7-day cache policy as mentioned by Nick Craver). If not, the content is not sent! SE is moving more and more to SVG, which aren't real images any more. And also, if you choose to ...


2

One thing to avoid is using the alt-text for image attribution, or identifying the source of the image. I did that for a while, and at the time seemed okay, but the info is of no use to anyone who requires the alternative text. Where attribution info for an image should be stored, well that's another question entirely.


1

We can confirm from the generated HTML that the alt text is present in full. If it is not rendered by your browser, you will need to discuss this with the vendor who created it. In your case, that'll be team responsible for WebKit. In the case of the iOS app, I assume WebKit is being used, so again this is something to kick upstream. Similar previous ...


1

First, it should be noted that the goal of alt text is to describe the image for anybody who is unable to see it for any reason. Maybe somebody is using a text-only browser to cut down on loading time or bandwidth. Maybe somebody is blind, and using a braille display to read an answer. Maybe the imagehost is suffering downtime, permanently taken offline, or ...


1

I don't think this is a bug. Google (or Bing) doesn't find your post when I use the words from the image description. If I use the word tiananmen your question is my first result. So even Google considers alt text not as content that is important enough to be indexed. Given the fact that the Stack Exchange Search engine doesn't even try to be better as ...


1

Alternatively, write the alt-text first, highlight it, then upload an image. The alt-text will be enclosed as.. the alt-text of the image. Example: Write Add image pop up box Highlight it Click the image uploader button and upload the image The result will be ![Add image pop up box][1]1 1 Technically, it's [![Add image pop up box][1]][1] since the feature ...


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