New answers tagged

11

I'm disappointed that the blog entry didn't really address the breakdown in communication that you indicated. Sara's entry says "I made the tough call to stop asking employees to make announcements there and to pull back from the platform a bit.", but doesn't go into why or how communications got so bad. What I saw wasn't really a pullback by staff, but ...


9

I agree with the other answers, regarding "leadership", and meaningful ways of taking responsibility. And kudos for having the guts to write that down, and open yourself up for feedback of any sort. Beyond that, what I find refreshing: Several people across different teams felt that those numbers didn’t match their experience with meta and community ...


12

While the important parts have been covered - Mith's done a good job with talking about what you lost over time with respect to the people specialized in actually dealing with the community. Shog and Jon's advice is worth their weight in gold, and now that I got some sleep and coffee, I have a solid base to build off of. And while Yaakov wrote the '...


4

TL;didR: "We regret that we actually need Meta: but turns out that we do, so here's the vaguest post so far, without mentioning any specifics at all." This is my final interaction - SE is clearly convinced that nothing specifically wrong ever happened, there was no 2019 at all, and the post seems offended for needing to come back to this again. That, in ...


33

First of all, I am very mindful of Sara Chipps' excellent and insightful blog post about the effect of multiple people giving negative feedback, even politely and constructively. With that in mind, I want to start by thanking her for being brave enough to actively watch this post and respond to the answers and comments. Thank you, Sara, I can imagine how ...


78

From the post: I heard feedback from a significant number of Stack Overflow employees that they avoided [posting] on Meta because of the reaction it garnered. Though this was not felt by all staff who interacted on Meta, and it affected different people to varying degrees, many felt discouraged or experienced full on anxiety at the thought of making a ...


11

First off, a post like this takes a lot of bravery to write, and for that, irrespective of the outcome over the next few months: thank you for the humility, and thank you for the courage to have owned up and taken responsibility for the decision. I don't know many people who would've done this if they could have avoided it. It's good that you've gone over ...


23

I think it is worth thinking about the organization of a written work when considering what the writer intends to make the reader think. Everything starts from the beginning. The first paragraph in this post says: leadership is hard. It asks the reader to sympathize with people in leadership positions. This frames the post as about the writer rather than ...


4

Could you split the Other group in the “What do you find most frustrating or unappealing about using Stack Overflow?” graph? The Other group is by far the most common group, and reading further: we found most of it (85% of all “other” responses) fell into one of three groups: negative feedback about Stack Overflow company/leadership, concerns around ...


97

I've linked to this countless times over the past year, but clearly I need to do so again: Effective Apologies Include Six Elements – Association for Psychological Science – APS. The titular "six elements" are: Expression of regret Explanation of what went wrong Acknowledgment of responsibility Declaration of repentance Offer of ...


40

The thing that strikes me the most about Sara's message is that there's no clear "I was wrong" statement. Sure, there's hints of this ("In hindsight, it would have been preferable to reach consensus through more research earlier[...]"), but nowhere in the blog post can we read in clear words that she did make a huge mistake. When public figures (the good ...


60

So.... first thoughts. This reads like it was intended to be an apology of sorts — that corp, after realizing that they were acting with bad or incomplete data and took actions that, well, caused the biggest hullabaloo on the network to date, are now trying to fix some of that damage. It's... a start. It includes taking responsibility for some of ...


21

When public figures (the good ones) make the wrong call, it’s admirable when they admit it publicly and share what they are doing to right the wrongs. I am still waiting for that to happen. Wrongs haven't been admitted nor rectified. "I’m personally looking forward to getting to know more of the users that frequent our Meta sites as we spend more ...


6

Looks like this has been fixed. Much better!


6

I think the real point ... is simply a re-iteration of what was written in January already: there needs to be a consistent, well thought strategy about tags. Which tags exist, and how exactly are they used, and most importantly: infrastructure around that, to easily use these tags for navigation!


15

This has changed now, and showing a pencil icon instead:


3

The comments have it right (cheers user1306322 and Shadow Wizard). This is a per-post setting (Sticky) that we use to ensure that new posts are at the top of the main page. In practice, we end up featuring almost everything, though there are times where we have a product announcement or something else that we want on the blog, but not above our featured ...


3

FWIW we recently(-ish) changed the feed of one of the chatrooms in an attempt to filter out the noise. https://stackoverflow.blog/tags/community,company,stackexchange,survey/feed It's mostly cleaned up our feed. Unfortunately the most recent Teams ad still ended up getting included, and I don't think it's possible to filter out specific tags.


9

Thank you for reporting, this one is fixed. For any interested Wordpress developers, it was a bad interaction between two plugins we use - Co-Authors Plus and Yoast.


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