51

2020 Update: It looks like the answer may end up being "Just under a decade". At the rate he's currently going, Gordon Linoff will overtake Jon around the end of February 2023, 9.5 years after this question was asked.


46

Jon can't exceed the daily gap without a large number of accepted answers (which, along with bounties, are the only things that don't count towards the gap). To get accept marks, you'll have to keep on contributing. If Jon were to stop answering, he would still gain 200 points every day for the foreseeable future, but other users who continue to gain ...


33

This math is pretty straightforward. At the moment I write this, Jon has 606,882 rep and #2 has 463,940 - a gap of about 150,000 rep. He gets 200-400 rep a day, the rep cap plus accepts. (Other answers have said 10K a month, which is roughly 300 a day.) Assume, for the fastest possible catchup: Jon's accepts stop dead when he stops posting answers User #2 ...


30

A system like this presumes that duplicate closure is flawless. And my God, it is far from that. You're basically punishing people for the fact that the biggest broken thing in all of this is that no one could reliably search for a duplicate question. Can we just fix broken search instead of shooting someone who may be acting in good faith?


27

You can check the reputation tab on their profile to see where the reputation actually comes from, but in short the daily reputation cap is only for reputation earned from upvotes and suggested edits. It doesn't prevent you from also earning reputation by other means, such as accepted answers or bounties.


22

I'm with you on that one. I've already suggested this to be done with something along the lines of


21

To control your addiction. If you reach the rep cap it is time to return to your real life. It works for me. And I really think it is a good thing. If we would not have it some people would just go on and on and maybe could not stop chasing that rep all the time.


19

If the recalculation causes you to reach 200 reputation on new days, then yes, your progress towards the badges will increase. There is no "tick" that gets added to a day when you hit it before. Each time the process for that badge runs, it just looks for how many days you achieved 200 reputation and sets that as the count for your badge progress.


18

I believe that part of the problem that SE has is a contradiction between two goals. On the one hand, SE intend their network of sites to become a repository of canonical questions and answers. That is, they want the sites to become a reference work or encyclopedia. On the other hand, they want the sites to be a place where anyone can ask a question and get ...


17

Jon Skeet is about 143K reputation above the next highest users. Furthermore, he has over 27,000 posts. He hit the reputation cap today 6 hours in to the day. Most likely, he will get 200 reputation even if he doesn't answer another question for a long time to come. But that will limit his ability to get accepted answers, dropping his rate down some. This ...


16

The system already corrects this on its own. We don't run a recalc on your account every time you change a vote - that's just way too expensive. Instead, whenever your account gets recalculated again next, you'll lose the 1 reputation because it won't make sense anymore. You'll only keep the erroneous reputation as long as it takes the system to schedule a ...


15

I started off with the query pointed out by Martijn and ended up with this beauty Be careful if you count rows when you are joining tables... Do note that these results might be slightly off because downvotes are anonymous so those votes on answers are not subtracted. SEDE is update weekly (On Monday!?) so at best the data is off for a week. ; with topusers ...


14

Many years ago, we simplified the logic for the daily reputation badges. They only consider positive reputation changes. That means the script that awards the badge doesn't even look at downvotes, and in that regard doesn't actually pay attention to how much net reputation you earned at all. It only adds up the total reputation you gained from upvotes, ...


14

All you have written is your assumption. If you have lost (not gained) actual reputation due to reputation cap because of the serial voting, tomorrow any reputation you have lost due to serial voting will be given to you. From What is serial voting and how does it affect me? Will I get back reputation lost due to the reputation cap? Yes. Whenever serial ...


14

It's probably more related to what you can do with the reputation than what is necessary to reach the daily reputation limit. For instance, it takes 2.5 days (2 if you have the association bonus) to get access to the review queues (Meta Stack Exchange is an exception) which is one of the keystones of moderation on Stack Exchange. In addition, on beta sites, ...


14

if a user has been a member for many years That doesn't mean they've been an active contributor for years. You could have registered a long time ago, not visited the site in years, and come back while basically knowing nothing more than an average new user who just signed up. they know all about the Stack Exchange policies and all that How do you propose ...


13

My rep was capped on 26 days but I reached 200 on only 23 days? I manually went through all of your reputation and this seems to be the case. Prior to Nov 19, you hit the rep cap (from upvotes only) exactly 26 times. However, there are 3 instances where you didn't gain a net of 200. This explains the 23 days.. I don't know if this is a bug or not. ...


13

(tl;dr? Skip to the last three paragraphs.) The reputation cap is one of the network's longest-running features, having been set at 200 since the month Stack Overflow launched, if not earlier. Records from back then are... spotty. Background Many features we take for granted today, like restricted editing, review queues, and association bonuses, didn't ...


13

As your full reputation history from the /reputation page shows, you've earned 335 reputation from votes cast today, not including reversals of votes cast prior to today. This is equal to 200 capped reputation plus 9 accepted answers times 15 reputation, as you point out. This leaves a deficiency of -22 points. Going through your reputation history on your ...


12

You got several downvotes during the day. If you: hit the cap got 4 downvotes to put you -8 below the cap got another upvote, you get +8 to hit the cap again got another downvote, putting you -2 below the cap got another upvote, you hit the cap again with +2 then that explains exactly the pattern you see. Then again, when you hit the rep cap and there ...


12

I've only recently started hitting 200 rep per day on a semi-regular basis (on rpg.se), and it seems to me the cap has the following benefits, in particular on a site with relatively small active membership: It stops certain individuals from answering too many questions, as they are likely to stop answering once their daily cap has been reached. Conversely ...


11

None. Reversed votes are marked as "deleted" in the system and do not affect your rep cap on any day, including days where the votes originally occurred. The events in your reputation history are only there to keep track of your reputation (because it's weird if your reputation just changes dramatically with nothing to tell you why). This functions the same ...


11

It's a bug in the trigger for the repcalc script. Ever since Nick rolled out the new rep system, anything that can cause your rep to get out-of-sync will trigger a recalc. So it should be impossible for your actual rep to stay out-of-sync. But Shog as confirmed a possible bug in the logic that determines when a recalc should be done. Correct Behavior: When a ...


11

Yes, you hit the rep cap. You got enough upvotes to earn 200 points. You also lost points because a user got removed. A user removal entry in the log is informative; it tells you that votes once cast no longer count. Those votes were cast on another day, and the 10 points you gained from them no longer apply. It is as if those votes never happened in the ...


11

As the "sandmen" are going to get rep, what about "Give an incentive for finding duplicate questions" along with a way they can explain to the questioner why it is a duplicate.


10

If you delete the answer, your reputation will be recalculated as if the post never existed, meaning you will receive the reputation on other qualifying upvotes for the day instead, since you now didn't gain anything from those ones. Upon undeleting, the same exact process ensues. Your reputation is recalculated as if that post had existed all along. If ...


10

What happens when the site graduates or otherwise grows? Do you apply the rep cap then or leave the site with no cap? In the former case you are going to get lots and lots of complaints from people about the new restriction you've just applied. In the latter case you have a site that is completely different to every other site in the network. Most people ...


10

The main problem for Stack Exchange is that their platforms are unwelcoming by design. When new joiners ask a question, they often get dupe hammered, heavily downvoted and/or their question gets closed because of low quality. After asking their first question, their first experience is generally very negative. This has been discussed in many blogs and Reddit ...


10

In this case, the reputation league shows the correct amount of reputation gained. However, there is a bug in the functionality involving deleted posts, which are calculated as if they were not deleted and not subject to the daily reputation limit. This leads to situations where several users appear to have gained way more than 2000 reputation in a week, ...


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