54

Yes please! Another option would be giving moderators a mass retag privilege. Retagging a question used to be one of the smallest privileges, attainable at just 500 reputation, so surely we trust the moderators enough to let them mass remove a tag from questions? Removing tags is a very simple operation. The only reason the job needs moderator/dev/community ...


36

The moderator who answered the question is not the same moderator who converted your answer to a comment. He followed the correct (IMO) protocol of flagging your answer, just as any other user could do. (One other user did also flag your post as 'not an answer'.) Your answer is a link-only answer, and as pointed out in the comments, those are looked upon ...


32

As a stopgap until we get Tim's new mod interface out, you can now dismiss individual flags (or really, same-type flags) on posts. Just click the flag text on an active flag to bring up the normal dismiss UI - the flag you're handling will be outlined in breathtaking maroon: Note that while you can use this to decline disputed flags (while still marking ...


32

There is a special moderator-only /review interface in the works, that will allow moderators to validate or decline flags individually. As of this writing it's partially complete, it was part of an overhaul of moderator tools that we did about a month and a half ago. However, we fully intend to finish it in less than six to eight weeks soon, dev workload ...


31

It took two years, but I managed to get a job at Stack Exchange specifically to investigate this for myself, that's just how dedicated I really am. The answer is: (drum roll) ... It's recorded, just like any other flag, but the data isn't really analyzed. If you think that an auto-generated flag isn't helpful enough, isn't helpful at all or should be ...


31

First off, a crucial bit of clarification: there are no private / secret rules for moderators. There are private instructions, guidelines, tools and instructions for using those tools. In the rest of this post, I'll attempt to explain why we have these things. Private moderator guidance is always based on public discussion; as with just about everything ...


24

I like the idea of changing things so that moderators can be more autonomous when it comes to tag cleanups. In the same breath, communities need to be more autonomous when it comes to managing synonyms. Our tag management tools haven't seen much love in quite a while, and we need to fix that. The current obstacle to allowing AMTBs (Autonomous Moderator Tag ...


24

I'm in two minds about this. Mods, contrary to popular belief, are humans too. As such, we can be as annoying as the next person. We do, and certainly should, try to be well behaved, exemplary users, but that doesn't mean we can't have friction with another user based on the respective personalities involved (so not only because we did our job as mods and ...


22

I think we need some facts: casperOne did not delete the answer, another moderator did. The answer was deleted because it contained only a link. Link only answers are extremely problematic for us due to link rot. The action that the other moderator took was appropriate There is no conspiracy to remove competing answers. If we were all twelve years old, I ...


22

Parts of the Help Center that moderators can edit: An introduction section on the front page (http://foo.stackexchange.com/help): "What topics can I ask about here?" (http://foo.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic): Parts of the Tour that moderators can edit: The introduction paragraph: The example question: These bullet points: Note ...


22

I'd say let people ignore chat moderators at their own risk. "You" in this answer is "you" generic, rather than the OP or any particular person. Even if you're not a troublemaker, it's still entirely possible that I annoy you, and you'd rather not have to engage with me. I don't have a problem with that - the opposite, in fact, given that you ignoring me ...


22

Is this true? Are there secret instructions for the moderators? Yep. We have mod pages in the help center, that we can access at /help/mods. Why are these instructions not public? It goes against the spirit of transparency, in my view. Is there a valid reason why they should be private? Yes - this stuff is private. ;) It contains details about ...


19

You have to assume that everything is logged somewhere - how long that's retained and who has access to it depends a lot on the specific data and scenario. As a more practical rule, you should figure that moderators can see anything you can see when viewing your profile - the only exception I'm aware of there is your votes which are yours alone.


18

Actually there are no unicoins. It's all just a prank on the mods and meta regulars. Instead of actually implementing something, the devs realized that it would be easier to just get a bunch of users to ask meta questions and raise flags about unicoins as if they existed. You fake up a few screenshots, tell them all how it would have worked, and you're ...


18

Yes, diamond moderators have access to a special timeline on posts which does list all close and reopen votes (and who cast them) inside it, including any that have expired or otherwise no longer count. Close and reopen votes are the only votes that they see in that timeline, though. This information proved valuable to me, as a moderator on Stack Overflow, ...


17

Up until October 2016 moderators couldn't see the version history of comments, though the revision history is kept in the database. All we could see was an indicator that the comment had been edited.


17

For the most part, status-planned means we are actually actively doing stuff to make it happen. Much of the time, someone's literally working on writing the code, although sometimes we're nailing down a spec or defining edge cases. It's usually reserved for things we're totally committed to. So, since we don't run big backlogs in favor or prioritizing ...


17

My first assumption is that it's gatekeeping and rank farming. The system is build on the premises of gamification, so there is an aspect of farming, no doubt. It is all fun. Do employers take SO ranking in to consideration? For sure there are HR departments that take these fake internet points very seriously. I don't expect they will retain much of ...


16

At the risk of reopening an old discussion, this would be very useful over at economics.SE (where I am currently a moderator) and I guess many of the other small sites now coming into the network. There is often a good degree of subjectivity to the decision of whether a question should be closed or not, which makes me reluctant to act unilaterally. However,...


16

Moderators can comment on deleted posts. In limited circumstances, this ability allows Moderators to leave feedback or let users know why their post was deleted. But other than that, Moderators cannot answer or vote on deleted posts.


15

As of October 2016, moderators can see comment revision history by clicking on the "edited" pencil icon next to the comment in question.


15

No user becomes a moderator automatically after reaching 10k. They just gain access to moderation tools, but that's not the same comparing to the tools real moderators (who have a diamond) get. The comment moderation is the part of the abilities the moderators on, for example, Stack Overflow have, as well as employees of Stack Exchange who have diamonds, ...


15

The private help pages for moderators are mostly about the tools that are available to moderators, and some advice on how to use those tools. The only truly secret part are the tools to detect and handle vote fraud and sock puppets. Some sections of those pages are essentially just summaries of broader meta discussions, for convenience and easy access. I ...


13

You bring up a good question. How should moderators handle questions and answers they have participated in as a normal user? It's a grey area, but the way that we usually handle something like this is just what was done here. It's generally accepted that moderating a question where you stand to benefit (due to having asked the question or given an answer) ...


13

Let me - for a change - focus on Because some are reading the question and ignoring the statement in the title, it bears restating - "A moderator should not be allowed to moderate questions in which they have participated in answering (and vice versa)". I want this feature added (hence the feature-request tag). I don't think that would be a good ...


13

This suggestion seems to be generating a lot of debate about what comments are for. I think it's equally important to ask what moderators are for. Moderators are supposed to be "human exception handlers", who deal with exceptional cases where the normal up vote / down vote system doesn't work. The ordering of comments is hardly exceptional: for most posts ...


13

Here's a question where this is demonstrated. It was closed by a mod, then years later deleted by a mod. Neither are mods now, but I'm able to cast reopen and undelete votes. Per these questions: Is moderator retirement supposed to affect possibility of undeletion? Can't undelete a closed question because a person who deleted it became a moderator ...


13

o hai :) Diamond mods bypass reputation requirements for privileges. I'm also a developer working at Stack Overflow under the Q&A umbrella team (not every developer here has "developer" access to all Q&A sites, which is confusing, but hopefully you get the idea), so even without a diamond, I'd have the same access to downvotes. The only time that ...


13

Now what happens when users with moderation powers delete their own posts that already have upvoted answers? Perhaps they shouldn't? I'm reluctant to use moderator powers on content that's associated with me as a user. I wouldn't, for example, handle or clear a flag that someone might raise against something I posted. If a regular user couldn't delete ...


12

I can fully understand that this functionality isn't useful for StackOverflow. On the other hand I think it's very useful for a smaller website like Skeptics where the community wants to decide democratically whether or not to close a question. Doing it through regular votes seems to be a better way than having to do it on meta.


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