51

2020 Update: It looks like the answer may end up being "Just under a decade". At the rate he's currently going, Gordon Linoff will overtake Jon around the end of February 2023, 9.5 years after this question was asked.


46

Jon can't exceed the daily gap without a large number of accepted answers (which, along with bounties, are the only things that don't count towards the gap). To get accept marks, you'll have to keep on contributing. If Jon were to stop answering, he would still gain 200 points every day for the foreseeable future, but other users who continue to gain ...


33

This math is pretty straightforward. At the moment I write this, Jon has 606,882 rep and #2 has 463,940 - a gap of about 150,000 rep. He gets 200-400 rep a day, the rep cap plus accepts. (Other answers have said 10K a month, which is roughly 300 a day.) Assume, for the fastest possible catchup: Jon's accepts stop dead when he stops posting answers User #2 ...


28

A TLDR, simple answer: Go to this StackExchange Data Explorer Query, provide your userid (clip it from your profile url on the site) and a Reputation Cutoff, and you'll see where you rank (in terms of the top N percent, as opposed to percentile rank discussed further below). Interesting cutoffs: 1 - Rank vs All users 200 - Rank vs those tracked in the ...


27

You can check the reputation tab on their profile to see where the reputation actually comes from, but in short the daily reputation cap is only for reputation earned from upvotes and suggested edits. It doesn't prevent you from also earning reputation by other means, such as accepted answers or bounties.


26

According to this SEDE query (which might not be entirely accurate, since it can't account for answer downvotes given by users), eleven: Biblical Hermeneutics: Soldarnal overtook Dɑvïd Bicycles: Criggie overtook Argenti Apparatus DevOps: 030 overtook Tensibai History: Tom Au overtook T.E.D. Homebrewing: Brewchez overtook Denny Conn Italian Language: Charo ...


24

a lone character) trailing after a mere link once was, is no more


17

Jon Skeet is about 143K reputation above the next highest users. Furthermore, he has over 27,000 posts. He hit the reputation cap today 6 hours in to the day. Most likely, he will get 200 reputation even if he doesn't answer another question for a long time to come. But that will limit his ability to get accepted answers, dropping his rate down some. This ...


16

This is an artifact of requiring more than 200 reputation to be tracked in the leagues in the first place. Perhaps we should change that table a bit.


12

Reputation leagues will recompute as well (should be in the next couple days or so) and will reflect the new vote value.


11

The means to do this would be to utilize our API, which wouldn't be very difficult, quite a few people have done similar things. I don't think this would work as a core feature because reputation alone is already a bit much when it comes to extrinsic motivation for some - adding more carrots at the end of the stick in a contest is definitely not going to ...


11

That +49287 you see is your increase in rank for the category that you're looking at. Your increase in reputation is a different number.


11

In the 6 to 8 weeks this takes to get fixed, you can use the following userscript that solves the bug: // ==UserScript== // @name set selected site // @namespace https://meta.stackexchange.com/users/158100/rene // @version 0.1 // @description set selected site in league // @author rene // @match https://stackexchange.com/...


11

On the year reputation league page, there is a « prev year link under Year 2021 to get rankings for Year 2020. Your rank for 2020 can be found here.


10

In this case, the reputation league shows the correct amount of reputation gained. However, there is a bug in the functionality involving deleted posts, which are calculated as if they were not deleted and not subject to the daily reputation limit. This leads to situations where several users appear to have gained way more than 2000 reputation in a week, ...


10

Wrong base assumption. Stack Overflow (and Super User) users are not sustaining the whole world-wide-web. Programmers can solve bugs and problems all on their own without asking on Stack Overflow. Programmers can ask their co-workers and friends for help, instead of asking on Stack Overflow. There are other sites besides Stack Overflow with possible ...


9

This was a bug; the setting got accidentally turned off somehow. Should be working again now.


9

It's worth remembering that the reputation leagues are "just for a bit of fun", and they aren't really worth worrying about. They aren't going to show up in anything but the all time high scores, and least for me, it's been motivating - I WILL CATCH UP WITH JohnT some day..... Maybe it's going to be a little like the old Seinfeld episode The Frogger, and ...


8

The leagues are generated once per day. The last time they were generated was at midnight and no data for 2015 could have been collected at that point, the league data can only take activity up to that point into account. If only data up to 2014-12-31 23:59:59 can be used, there is nothing to calculate for 2015.


8

This is sort of already available in the form of combined flair: However that usercard can't be reached from the normal profile nor from the network profile and the global flair does not include accounts with less than 200 reputation. You can use The Stack Exchange Data Explorer to query all databases for a specific account. The query requires an accountid ...


8

That belongs to David Robinson, who earned 1550 reputation thanks to three bounties worth 500 reputation and five answer upvotes on July 6, 2013. The full post and the queue to find that out is in this link: https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/267558/4052384 And no, Jon Skeet does not have the record unfortunately.


8

Because reputation isn't inter-exchangeable among sites. 1000 reputation on Seasoned Advice means a lot more than on Stack Overflow. This is just because it is harder to gain reputation on smaller sites since often the number of voters are lower. Even on a single site it is hard to measure reputation, since very active tags tend to attract more voters than ...


8

This has been fixed. The issue existed due to the way that we loaded the league status for a user - if it is in cache then it is loaded in to the view on the server-side, otherwise it is loaded in a client-side call (so as not to hold up the page load). For cases where a user did not yet have any league ranking, the client-side would not return anything. ...


8

The change is the delta between this year's rank and last year's rank. Your rank each year is determined by your yearly rep, not your total rep. Your total rep value of 4,078 is shown there for informational purposes only but is not a factor in calculating the annual change figure. This year your rank is #32487. That means that 32486 people earned more rep ...


8

Easy one: by putting in tremendous amounts of time and energy. See a user like Gordon Linoff on Stack Overflow. Besides writing books and running a successful business place, he writes 10, 20 answers per day. Any day. Great answers that is. So he makes 200 reputation from upvotes, and then 90, 180, ... from accepts on many answers. Every day. 2000 rep ...


8

It means they are now ranked 59 and last quarter they were ranked 6268 + 59 = 6327. I.e. that column shows the change in rank, not changes in reputation.


8

It's quite easy to generate an all-time leaderboard using the Stack Exchange Data Explorer. As an example, I have compiled a list of user IDs from Stack Exchange staff (via this method) and used that for a Meta Stack Exchange leaderboard for this group: Note that SEDE is updated once a week, on Sunday morning (but the leaderboards aren't real-time either). ...


7

The reputation league numbers ignore losses from "private reputation events" such as deleted posts and the -1 from downvotes you cast, the same stuff that is not shown publicly in your profile. Your total reputation obviously doesn't ignore this. Thus, it looks like your numbers are off. In 2017 you actually had a year rep of 451 and a total rep of 447:


7

Try this: https://stackexchange.com/leagues/mathoverflow.net The "site name" parameter is actually the host name - so Super User is https://stackexchange.com/leagues/superuser.com, English is https://stackexchange.com/leagues/english.stackexchange.com, etc. But that's verbose, so the route accepts shorter names and tries to guess the rest of the host name: ...


7

According to How does "TOP 10%" work in the Developer Story?, this SEDE query calculates the top x% for any given user and tag. It says you're in the top 3% (see below); you'll have to fork the query to find out what score exactly is needed to get into the top 1%.


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