45

But, I'm very curious to know why is the Stack Exchange team ignoring them? We aren't. Sure, they're low-priority bugs, but nevertheless they're bugs. Regarding Jeff's tweet, you should know two things: Although you can never be 100% sure, I am pretty certain that it was tongue-in-cheek. To the best of my knowledge, Jeff has yet to personally come to ...


36

I don't have any insider knowledge but the diamond looks like pretty much the only satisfactory option if the design criteria were for a Unicode symbol (for ease of implementation and insertion into text usernames), that was widely supported across browsers in 2008, is bold and stands out clearly against text, and doesn't have confusing technical or other ...


30

The original three (also called the trilogy) came into being before Area 51 existed: Stack Overflow Server Fault Super User After that, two sites that were created via the former Stack Exchange 1.0 model got fully merged into the network (the idea behind Stack Exchange 1.0 was to host sites on different topics for other people in exchange for payment - ...


27

…or is this site's name a combination of Stack Overflow and an exchange of ideas? I can't say with absolute certainty, but I'm fairly sure this is the correct explanation. While one might speculate there was some influence by the proximity of the FogCreek offices to the New York Stock Exchange, "StackExchange"* was originally intended to be sold as a ...


25

I'm afraid the explanation here is kinda boring. There's a job that runs weekly which deletes any question more than 365 days old which... has a score of 0 or less, or a score of 1 or less in case of deleted owner has no answers is not locked has view count <= the age of the question in days times 1.5 has 1 or 0 comments On Super User, ...


23

There are several different answers that probably explain what you are seeing. The short answer is there wasn't really an epic shift, but gradual change as the community matured and adjusted itself. Time itself is ultimately the biggest factor in how most users achieve high reputation. There are some factors unique to the early days of the site that ...


21

It's not the first. Here are the other renames across the network: Information Security née IT Security Community Building née Moderators. Music: Practice & Theory née Musical Practice & Performance Arqade née Gaming Beer, Wine & Spirits née Beer Mi Yodeya née Jewish Life & Learning History of Science and Mathematics née History of Science ...


21

Because the total delete votes needed scale based on score. Doing a quick history score calculation for that question just before it was deleted gives me this: up | down | score | est. voters needed | ----------------------------------------- 401 | 8 | 393 | 19 | That roughly matches the 18 voters you've found. The number of ...


20

The stats aren't everything. They certainly help, but five numbers cannot guarantee that we have a good, viable site on our hands. Robert wrote a blog post about the AI site when it was shut down that goes into the details of what happened with that site and the lessons we started learning from it at the time. The main reasons for the closure were these: ...


17

I have located the earliest live version of Stack Overflow available from the Internet Archive: 2008-09-15T10:33:43Z. This is the public beta. (The preceding snapshot is of a math cartoon.) Interesting tidbit: back then, the favicon had a white background; now it's transparent (Firefox 16 on Linux): It didn't look like much (but I guess the CSS probably ...


16

Not much of a story - there wasn't much interest in the "Stack Exchange" platform as a product. There were a few sites that were created and most of them didn't gain any traction - turns out that to have a thriving Q&A site, you need a community behind it (that's the philosophy behind Area 51 proposals - show us there is a community, and it will get a ...


15

Stack Overflow was the beginning. It was the original, first site. It being popular, it spawned a few other sites - Server Fault and Super user. Which then started spawning other Q&A sites. This evolved into the network of sites you see today - the Stack Exchange network of sites. You can see the evolution if you start reading the Stack Exchange blog ...


14

I don't think Jeff really spent that much time when deciding to use the diamond character. But from the top of me head here are some possible reasons, in case he did give it some thought: Diamond is the strongest natural material. It implies power and toughness. Diamond is rare. Not just anyone can have one, or in this case, become a moderator. The diamond ...


14

C'mon, there were NOT 17 sites that launched in 2008! Your graph is WRONG, as you are counting the earliest post: on Software Engineering, the earliest post is dated Aug 1 '08 (as it was migrated from Stack Overflow), while the site was actually created Sep 1 '10, according to Community's age (which is the same as the site age). A correct graph (that's also ...


12

The first public mention that I know of of the name "Stack Exchange" was in Stack Overflow Podcast #58 (streaming audio) (released June 17, 2009). Joel Spolsky and Jeff Atwood discussed naming from 00:04:40 to 00:08:00, and discussion of the name "Stack Exchange" in particular is mostly at the beginning of that segment. Spolsky noted that Jason Calacanis ...


12

In terms of the software itself, absolutely nothing. It's an arbitrary name that was invented to refer to the old sites which used the paid software provided to them, most of which were integrated into our network again at some point. "Stack Exchange 2.0" was another arbitrary term used to highlight a huge turning point in the network. We stopped providing ...


11

When: September, 2011 Why: With a question volume of between 4,000 and 5,000 questions per day, it no longer "made sense" Source Programmers (now Software Engineering) followed suit a year later


11

Ran some queries :) BECAUSE SCIENCE, DAMMIT. Jarrod cast the first vote still in the system, however it has an ID of 1, so I'm assuming it was in fact the first vote (and not purged after a bunch of testing stuff). The timestamp on that magical moment is: 2008-07-31 21:28:01 It was a down-vote, and I'm certain it was done in testing. The first vote ...


10

Taken from Stack Exchange About page: Where did Stack Exchange come from? In 2008, Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky created a site called Stack Overflow and brought together millions of computer programmers from around the world to help each other with detailed technical questions.


8

Internet Archive to the rescue! For 2008-09-16 to 2010-11-10, refer to /faq. For 2010-11-11 to 2013-06-30, refer to /privileges. For 2013-07-01 to (present), refer to /help/privileges. (Note that "access review queues" wasn't a concrete privilege for a long time, and /review doesn't give much indication when you're not logged in (the Archive-bot isn't) - ...


8

Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky. Here is the very first podcast, and the wikipedia entries for Stack Overflow and the Stack Exchange Network.


8

The philosophical reasons for having a Meta site are eloquently summarized here: Listen to Your Community, But Don't Let Them Tell You What to Do Meta is, of course, the place where you go to discuss the place. Take a moment and think about what that means. Meta is for people who care so deeply about their community that they're willing to go one ...


8

I believe since Stack Overflow was the first site in the exchange the 'Stack' just comes from there for familliarity/branding. Exchange as a suffix come comes from the generic term 'knowledge exchange', which Jason Calacanis explained to Joel and Jeff in Podcast #56, half a year before the launch of Stack Exchange 1.0.


8

I think you are likely misinterpreting this: Stack Overflow questions are grouped by tags, created by programmers just like you. Using the right tags makes it easier for other programmers to find and answer your question. Here's a list of all current tags, along with a count of how many questions each tag contains. "created by programmers just like you" ...


7

A recent Jeff blog on Gamification suggests that badges may well be inspired by the Xbox 360 achievements... When Joel Spolsky and I set out to design the Stack Exchange Q&A engine in 2008 -- then known as Stack Overflow -- we borrowed liberally and unapologetically from any online system that we felt worked. Some of our notable influences ...


7

According to the video, it started in the Stack Exchange offices, where they had a tradition to hand out special hats to acknowledge outstanding work, initially to reward developers for fixing bugs and shipping features. And then it spread: community managers get hats for answers on meta that get more than 50 downvotes the marketing team get hats for ...


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