11

Looks like there was a comment on your answer explaining the reasoning behind the downvote. While people downvote for many reasons, including revenge and other types of malice, it sounds to me like in this case you're overthinking it a bit. I'm not saying you should be happy about getting a downvote, but this case didn't look malicious to me. Don't take it ...


10

It's not tactical at all. Your answer is being downvoted since folk have since realised that it's incorrect. (See the comment appended to your answer). The Stack Exchange sites are not social networks: they aim to build a library of questions and answers.


10

No. Votes, whether they are up or down, are the expression of the opinion of one member of the community. Debating that is debating the opinion of the community as a whole. If you disagree with the vote, just give your own vote and leave it there. (I wonder if I would start a 'protesting upvotes' question... I have never seen such a question here)


10

The biggest problem here is you're assuming that it's the person who posted another answer that downvoted you. You don't know that. Unless you're sitting there stalking their profile watching all their reputation changes, there's absolutely no possible way to know a person downvoted you. Assuming that will only cause problems for you, as it causes false ...


9

It wasn't me, no orange arrow: Not the OP either, he has no downvotes recorded. Just a passer-by, it is nothing unusual.


8

No, it's not. However, life, Stack Overflow included, is not generally fair and you'll be happier if you don't let yourself get too hung up on that. In the case of Stack Overflow, when the stakes are just mostly meaningless numbers, it's definitely not worth getting too worked up about a downvote you don't think is fair. People can downvote for whatever ...


8

There are quite a few questions along the lines of "Why was this question so heavily downvoted?" to be found here and on Meta Stack Overflow. It does often come up when someone stumbles across something that received a resoundingly negative response, and the reasons for that response aren't immediately clear. Kate brings up the first important thing to ...


8

What am I expected to do in this situation? Answer some more questions and move on. If your answer is truly correct, then the downvote will be corrected by the rest of the community at some point in the future. Where did I go wrong here? Nowhere, I don't think. I'm not a C/C++ guru so I can't speak to your answer, but you've contributed to the ...


8

Yes, Tactical down-voting is a problem, but It's very hard to know whether that's what's happening. But even if you could identify that the down-voting is tactical, there are even some of the opinion that you have the right to down-vote for whatever reason you please. every times someone down-votes, they get -1, so you can rest assured that any failed ...


7

Seems like the user has explained his down-vote, though he didn't have to. People are going to down-vote for a wide variety of reasons - maybe they don't like your hair, or maybe they think you down-voted them first, or, maybe, they don't think your answer is very good (and they may be right or they may be wrong). There is not much you can do about this. ...


6

Looking at the answer in question, you already did the right thing in this situation: you challenged the downvote by asking for clarification in the comments under your answer, and as it turns out the downvoter decided to reveal himself, explain his downvote, and you talked him round. In the event that the downvoter had opted to remain anonymous, though, ...


5

I don't understand the down-votes, personally. Your answer is correct. Don't assume it's tactical though, people vote for all sorts of reasons and rarely leave comments explaining why. I find the higher-voted answer easier to read, but that's a personal thing. That would probably cause me to up-vote that answer in favour of yours. But I wouldn't down-vote ...


5

Anyone is free to vote posts as they please. If they think a post isn't useful or helpful, they can downvote it. The reason your post got downvoted is because your answer doesn't explain much and/or the downvoter thinks it's wrong. Your answer tells the OP what he's doing wrong but fails to explain why it is wrong.


4

Being "off-topic, too broad, etc" is reason for close voting, and if you have access to the review queues, you can vote "leave open" on such questions. Downvoting is more subjective - and what's more, the issues that caused it (bad grammar, missing details, rude tone, appears to be a duplicate of a very commonly asked question) might be fixed by the time ...


4

Your answer was actually the fifth (as if that mattered, those five answers came inside 20 seconds), and several of the earlier answers contained the advice to change the parameter name to fix the issue. IMO the better fix. Still, although your code is in my opinion unnecessarily complicated, it's valid, so I wouldn't downvote it. Perhaps the downvoter (...


3

These downvotes will be removed by an automagic script which detects voting fraud, usually within a day (~12-24h tops). If these have not been removed within a day or so, flag one of your questions or answers which has been downvoted with an Other message for a moderator explaining exactly what you think is going on. However, just because you believe this ...


3

If you have been serially downvoted, the downvotes will be automatically reverted by a script. Users that resort to serial downvoting often enough will be flagged for moderator review and can face temporary suspensions if they don't improve. You can flag the comment where you challenged the user for the behaviour for moderator attention if you feel the ...


2

I doubt there are a lot of tactical downvoters hitting the rep cap often. It seems to me that the people who spend a lot of time on here are more respectful of the environment that Stack Exchange continuously tries to encourage. The people who spend a large majority of their time asking and answering questions on Stack Exchange seem more interested in ...


2

If an answer works, it works. The only time I'd downvote if is there's something seriously wrong with how it works (doesn't answer the question, opens up a serious security hole, etc). Given the community-driven nature of SO, you'll have to deal with bad apples sometimes, and there's no way to prevent that. Fortunately, it's a large community, and there's ...


1

It depends. Did the downvoted person repeat an already existing answer? Repeating an answer with your own words is only useful if you are able to repeat it in a much better way. Else the question will climb up, earn attention, people will spent time reading it and ask themselves, why you repeated an existing answer, instead of voting the similar answer up, ...


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