Hot answers tagged

14

As the FAQ page you linked says, there is no notification for users who engage in serial voting that their votes have been reversed, unless their serial voting involved downvoting answers (in which case they will sort of be notified because they will suddenly get their -1 penalties returned). There is one way you can tell manually, though: on your user ...


13

It's impossible to give a number. It will differ widely per site; a site like Community Building has 33 visits per day, much less than Stack Overflow. So there are no answers with 100 upvotes. Just looking at the traffic might not be enough; on some sites, users are more inclined to vote than on others. And even on Stack Overflow, a popular tag like [java] ...


11

It depends a lot on context. 50 upvotes on an answer within a few days isn't necessarily surprising. It happens all the time with posts that make it to the Hot Network Questions list. On the flip side, a few upvotes on a really bad question or answer could be highly unusual (maybe even a sign of voting fraud; I've seen it happen). The popularity of the ...


5

You want a graph, you get a graph. It's holiday season after all: As you noticed, vote timestamps are missing time information, and data may be (up to) 7 days old since SEDE is refreshed once a week on Sunday morning. Notice the use of parameters to reuse the query for multiple posts. Editing them repeatedly gets rather tedious :)


5

There is a tool called Stack Exchange Data Explorer that allows users to perform queries on Stack Exchange's databases. Although it's not graphical, the raw data can be used to create a graph. For instance, to view the voting history of the first ever Meta Stack Exchange question go to https://data.stackexchange.com/meta.stackexchange/query/new and run the ...


4

In my opinion, this is not a drastic difference. When you post a normal answer, you put some effort in it. No one can make an edit to it to add more information because it would deviate from the original intent of the post and wouldn't preserve your goals. If the effort you put is small, then your answer would be downvoted and you'll lose reputation. If it'...


4

There is no real answer to this question, unless the answer involves a LOT of criteria (which would be wrong, since answers are supposed to be clear and concise). Let's talk about why. Basically, there are some questions which are popular, and some that aren't. And this may not necessarily share a relationship with how good the question is or anything- it ...


3

I think this would help solve a common issue where questions are downvoted into oblivion because it costs the downvoter nothing. This may or may not be a good idea, but from the proposal, it's not possible to say. The aim... ...is to avoid questions being downvoted into oblivion. Is this even a problem? Outside of Meta.SE, my experience is that the ...


2

Unfortunately, no number can do that. First of all, the average vote count is really a function of time and more importantly, the average number of views. Here on MSE, hitting the 200 reputation daily cap limit is something that often just happens. During my years on stack overflow it was real hard work (most of the time at least) to hit that limit. ...


2

I will add in my own experience using Stack Exchange sites. Many sites (unpopular ones in particular, I primarily use the one related to natural sciences) have declined in both popularity and in terms of creating an encouraging environment because it has become too "strict" in terms of rules and regulations. While some questions clearly deserve a ...


1

Has the number of questions increased due to this new incentive? With a SEDE query you can check if the number of questions (and answers) increased after the change, but of course not if this is due to the new incentive. You'd only discover that if you hold a survey among the users asking the questions. Quality of questions is likewise hard to measure ...


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