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..and will that have any effect?

Currently, I want all of my contributions on StackExchange to be available not just under SE's licensing terms (that goes without saying), but also under a version of "Unless you're preventing other people from using it, fair game" kind of license.

Is that legally somehow possible without rehosting all of my content on say github?

To elaborate: I want people to be able to do anything they want with my code, without attribution, and the only thing they shouldn't be able to do is prevent other people from using my code. That means that I don't need or want credit and that the code can be used as much as anyone desires in any application.

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TL;DR: Yes.

Currently, I want all of my contributions on StackExchange to be available not just under SE's licensing terms (that goes without saying), but also under a version of "Unless you're preventing other people from using it, fair game" kind of license.

You can do this. The contributions you make to Stack Exchange sites you grant to Stack Exchange under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license. SE follow this license by adding your usercard to every post you make, so that it's attributed to you. They then require everyone using that content to attribute, also under the terms of CC BY-SA 3.0.

However, granting that license doesn't revoke your copyright. You still own the original rights to the work or code, and can do basically what you like with it. If "what you like" is "additionally grant everyone a more permissive license", you can do that because the copyright is yours. I do it myself - all code snippets I post are additionally licensed to anyone under the MIT license.

As for what license you want, that's down to you to decide. From the details you've specified, it sounds like you want CC0 - this dedicates the work to the public domain, so that anyone, anywhere, can use the work for anything, in any manner they wish. Nor can other people prevent anyone from using it, because nobody can remove it from the public domain.

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