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These are some stats that I have self calculated:

  • I have 10 zero score accepted answers.

  • Less than 40 total accepted answers.

  • I haven't self answered any questions.

  • The latest zero score accepted answer was like 17 days ago

And I haven't received the Unsung Hero badge yet.

How frequently does the badge allotment job run? Or am I missing something about the Unsung Hero?

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3 Answers 3

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https://meta.stackexchange.com/a/123521/223820

The OP should take comfort in the fact that they are not the first to have misinterpreted the instructions for gaining the Unsung Hero badge.

An experienced user wrote in 2012, which was edited in 2019, [emphasis in bold mine]

You get the badge when you have at least 10 answers that has been accepted with a score of zero, and those answers are at least 25% of all your accepted answers. For example, if you have 10 accepted answers with a score of zero, and 40 total accepted answers, then you get the badge.

That answer has attracted 84 upvotes, and amazingly no one has noticed the error until…? It's an easy mistake to miss because the number 10, which is a nice round figure, is often used in tests. In fact, many marks at school are given out of 10 or 100, not out of 11 or 101.

Often the instruction “more than 10” can easily be read as "10 or more", especially by non-native speakers, so why mention the number 10 in the first place? Wouldn't it be simpler to say:

"Zero score accepted on at least 11 answers.”
"At least 11 accepted answers without a score”

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    Yes, I read the same post. And probably that's how my subconscious worked, the "10" mind-game you talked about. hehe. Apr 7, 2021 at 7:45
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    @RishabhKumar Ah, that's interesting to know. So before you posted your question you actually did a bit of extra research and got mislead. Like I said, an understandable mistake to made. Apr 7, 2021 at 7:50
  • meta.stackexchange.com/a/68258/223820 the answer here uses parenthesis (11 or more) and makes the criteria clearer. Apr 7, 2021 at 7:53
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    This is more a feature request then an answer to this question. Perhaps you want to consider making it that in its own post.
    – Luuklag
    Apr 7, 2021 at 7:53
  • @Luuklag let someone else take the gauntlet. See my comment beneath Tinkeringbell's answer. Apr 7, 2021 at 7:55
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    @Luuklag The others answered my question, but I was still stunned, how did this number (10 or more) came to mind. Called myself stupid. And started doing my work. Mari clarified this. This is the most helpful answer to me with due respect. Apr 7, 2021 at 7:57
  • In fairness, however, that post was closed as a duplicate of the general list of badge criteria shortly after that answer was posted (and a few years later reopened and re-closed to change it to the new style of dupe notice), which did correctly indicate that "more than 10" answers were required two years prior to that question. I did make another edit to that FAQ to make it more clear. Apr 7, 2021 at 8:12
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    Yes, it's confusing (so +1) but it's only an off-by-one error ...
    – Glorfindel Mod
    Apr 7, 2021 at 8:55
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The description for unsung hero is

Zero score accepted answers: more than 10 and 25% of total

You have 10, which is not more than 10

Note also, there is a SEDE query you can run rather than doing a manual calculation

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If you have 10 zero score accepted answers, that's one too few.

The badge description is pretty clear on that:

Zero score accepted answers: more than 10

10 is not 'more than' 10.

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    @Mari-LouA That sounds like a different question, hashing that out in a comment here won't get it the attention it would need to lead to change.
    – Tinkeringbell Mod
    Apr 7, 2021 at 7:25
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    I was just sympathising with the OP, trying to explain why their mistake was an easy one to make. I've now deleted the comment and changed it into an answer. If someone wants, they can use it as a springboard to ask for a FR, I do not feel invested enough to make the effort. Apr 7, 2021 at 7:46

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